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All forms of commissioned artwork and consultation which can be viewed by the public in predominantly public places.

‘Heart of the Campus’. Site visit with VGL

Friday 27th June.

GLAZING MANIFESTATION ARTWORKS TO THE ‘HEART OF THE CAMPUS’ BUILDING FOR SHEFFIELD HALLAM UNIVERSITY, COLLEGIATE CAMPUS .

DIGITALLY PRINTED WHITE INKS OVERLAIN IN OPAQUE & TRANSPARENT LAYERS ONTO OPTICALLY CLEAR VINYL .

Up to Sheffield to walk around site with Carly Birkett of VGL . I am developing the glazing manifestation artwork in collaboration with VGL and we have limited time to get this project developed and installed. As usual the project contractors, Graham Construction were really helpful on site and assisted in the process of taking all ‘as built’ measures of the glazing screens which will take the artwork.

East elevation main entrance glazing screen.

East elevation main entrance glazing screen.

East elevation stonework cladding looking great.

East elevation stonework cladding looking great.

Level 2 atrium glazing screen.

Level 2 atrium glazing screen.

Draft artwork for digitally printed artwork manifestation to the East Entrance glazing screen.

Draft artwork for digitally printed artwork manifestation to the East Entrance glazing screen.

Draft artwork for the Level 1 'pod' glazing.

Draft artwork for the Level 1 ‘pod’ glazing.

Mock-up visual of draft artwork for the Level 2 glazing screen.

Mock-up visual of draft artwork for the Level 2 glazing screen.

Draft visual mock-up of applied digitally printed manifestation to Level 2 screens.

Draft visual mock-up of applied digitally printed manifestation to Level 2 screens.

The proposals for glazing manifestations is a continuation of the west elevation Rockpanel rains creen artwork, where cnc routed detailed drawings where been used to create a hard edged and graphic finish, dictated in part by its design influences in historic printmaking and metalworking in Sheffield and by the materials and methods of its own production. The manifestation artworks being are created using the same base visual language & influences developed & explored in the Rockpanel work. This proposal expands upon this concept to explore a softer more fluid application concerned with lightness, detail, transparency & opacity to create a balancing contrast to the dynamic geometry & scale of the building. ‘The designs are abstract & cloud-like, suggesting ephemeral objects, floating within the architectural space from the ground floor to the very top of the atrium roof. The interactions of the various patterns and forms, overlaying and meeting to create new shapes, details and transparencies suggest a coalescing of conversations, interactions, disciplines and dialogue. The exhalations & energy of everyone who may use this new building are manifest here’. The digitally printed vinyl manifestation is applied to the glazing directly which requires a lighter touch than the West Elevation artwork. The detail and narrative appear as if blown and drifted through the building. This project is a continuation, extension and elaboration of the recently completed West Elevation Rockpanel Rainscreen artwork, where cnc routed detail has been used to create a hard edged and graphic appearance, dictated in part by its origins in printmaking and metalworking and the materials and methods of its production. The original concept was developed as a contextual research document, which still stands as the concept driver for the project and is submitted for reference along with this presentation. ‘The manifestation artworks being proposed in draft form here are created from the same base visual language developed for the Rockpanel Rainscreen works of the west elevation, but expands upon this concept to explore a softer more fluid application concerned with light, space & transparency to create a balancing contrast to the dynamic geometry of the building.  

Mock-up visual of Level 2 Screen. White inks digitally printed and overlain.

Mock-up visual of Level 2 Screen. White inks digitally printed and overlain.

Artwork draft for the Level 2 atrium screen.

Artwork draft for the Level 2 atrium screen.

Level 2 Artwork draft for digitally printed glazing vinyl.

Level 2 Artwork draft for digitally printed glazing vinyl.

Draft artwork for Level 2 screen.

Draft artwork for Level 2 screen.

‘1479 plates’, Combe Down Stone Mines 2010

In December 2008 I was commissioned, along with a number of other artists, to respond to the Combe Down Stone Mines Stabilisation Project, which was nearing completion after a 10 year engineering led programme.

'1479 plates' at The Octagon, Bath.

‘1479 plates’ at The Octagon, Bath.    Image: Kevin Fern

Exterior of The Octagon, Bath

Exterior of The Octagon, Bath

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'1479 plates' at The Octagon, Bath. November 2009

‘1479 plates’ at The Octagon, Bath. November 2009

One of 788 Bone China plates produced for the installation.

One of 788 Bone China plates produced for the installation.

'1479 plates', The Octagon, Bath. Private View.

‘1479 plates’, The Octagon, Bath. Private View.   Image by ZED.

The Combe Down Stone Mines Project was a major project by Bath & North East Somerset Council to stabilise abandoned limestone mine workings in Combe Down and preserve the Health & Safety of the area. The aim of the Project was to remove the current threat to life and property of those living, working in and travelling through the Combe Down area. Collapse of the old mines, which in some instances, lay just metres beneath the surface, was a real possibility. In doing this, the Project ensured that the internationally recognised heritage, wildlife and environmental properties of the area were conserved for future generations.

The Combe Down Stone Mines Stabilisation Project was finally completed in 2010, with 25 hectares of very shallow limestone mines flooded with approximately 600,000 cubic metres of foamed concrete, the largest project of its kind in the world. Over the preceding 200 years some 700 houses had been built over the mines from which the stone was extracted to build Georgian Bath.

The project site of Combe Down, a village on the outskirts of Bath, falls within the World Heritage Site of Bath.

 

The installation work ‘1479 plates’, was exhibited at The Octagon, an 18th Century Chapel in Bath,  and featured a map of 788 bone china dinner plates , which explores the relationship between present day engineering and mining technology, stone mines heritage, natural history, and two 18th century entrepreneurs Ralph Allen and Josiah Wedgwood. The work was created in collaboration with ‘Autonomatic’ – 3D Digital Research Cluster at University College Falmouth. The plates were displayed on a curving monolithic wall, redolent of the architectural terraces in Bath, built with the stone from the mines. The exhibition was constructed and managed by REM, Richmond Event Management.

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A collection of plates from the 788 which made up the installation.

A collection of plates from the 788 which made up the installation.  Image: Portia Wilson

691 households affected by the stabilisation works were gifted a ceramic plate – one small part of the map – representing not only the individual household but the mining underworld beneath it. Following their display at The Octagon, the original 788 dinner plates were donated to form a large scale permanent installation in Combe Down village at some point in the future.

The arts project team was managed and led by Consultants Frances Lord and Steve Geliot.

Art Consultants: Frances Lord and Steve Geliot

‘1479 plates’ budget: £54,000.00

 Client:Bath & North East Somerset Council funded by the Homes and Communities Agency, formerly English Herirage. https://www.homesandcommunities.co.uk/combe-down-stone-mines

Agencies: Project Managers: Provelio. Main Contractors: Hydrock & Scott Wilson. Specialist Consultants: Oxford Archaeology, ‘Autonomatic’ & Digital Ceramics.

‘Heart of the Campus’, Sheffield Hallam University Collegiate Campus

14th May 2014

I made a site visit to the Heart of the Campus building along with Andrew Illingworth, Interior Designer for HLM Architects & Garry Farmer, Project Manager for Graham Construction, the main contractors on the project. Seen from Collegiate Crescent, the building is just visible behind the mature Beech trees.

Heart of the Campus building, just appearing behind the Beech trees on Collegiate Crescent.

Heart of the Campus building, just appearing behind the Beech trees on Collegiate Crescent.

East Elevation stonework looking incredibly sharp in the sunlight.

East Elevation stonework looking incredibly sharp in the sunlight.

I have been commissioned to extend the original brief for a cnc routed Rockpanel rainscreen on the West Elevation to include digitally printed vinyl manifestations for the East Elevation glazed curtain wall and interiors. This was an incredibly useful visit as the building has really moved forward since my last time here in January this year.

The interior atrium is three storeys high and filled with light. It is a dynamic architectural space which has as a centrepiece, a cantilevered cube projecting out from the first floor. When sunlight floods in via the fully glazed atrium roof, the whole building is suffused with light and shadows.

The interior atrium space is dynamic and light filled.

The interior atrium space is dynamic and light filled

A cantilevered cube meeting space project out into the atrium from the first floor.

A cantilevered cube meeting space project out into the atrium from the first floor me

This is the view from inside the first floor cantilevered cube.

This is the view from inside the first floor cantilevered cube room.

The atrium roof is fully glazed and when a break in the clouds fills the space with light and shadows, the effect is pretty wonderful.

The atrium roof is fully glazed and when a break in the clouds fills the space with light and shadows, the effect is pretty wonderful.

The interior of the main East Entrance to the building is a double height glazed curtain wall. This is an amazing site for the artwork manifestation.

The interior of the main East Entrance to the building is a double height glazed curtain wall. This is an amazing site for the artwork manifestation.

 

This is a part of the external East Elevation entrance, with the double height glazed curtain wall.

This is a part of the external East Elevation entrance, with the double height glazed curtain wall.

Whilst on site I couldn’t resist a quick look at the West Elevation Rockpanel ‘drawing’. This artwork is cnc routed into the rain screen panels & was manufactured by The Cutting Room in Huntingdon. The exposed base material, almost a bright yellow colour when first exposed, darkens in contact with sunlight and has now achieved its permanent shade. This is more subtle then when first installed, & has now blended in with its architectural setting. Up close, the detail is crisp and casts strong shadows on a sunny day.

West Elevation cnc 'drawing' on the Rockpanel  rain screen.

West Elevation cnc ‘drawing’ on the Rockpanel rain screen.

Cnc Rockpanel 'drawing' up close, which reveals the finer detailing and shadows cast.

Cnc Rockpanel ‘drawing’ up close, which reveals the finer detailing and shadows cast.

Detail: cnc routed Rockpanel 'drawing', up close.

Detail: cnc routed Rockpanel ‘drawing’, up close.

 

Draft designs for the glazing manifestation.

Draft designs for the glazing manifestation.

The first drafts for the glazing manifestations  were produced in January this year and use the same iconography as the West Elevation cnc work. The manifestations however, being digitally printed, have no need for hard edges and manageable cutting paths. The designs will work with transparency and light to achieve their results. Digital printing further allows for a range of softer and finer details to be introduced. This is what I am currently working on. The manifestations serve a distinct purpose and have to comply with building regulations. Beyond that, the artwork can develop in many original ways to drift through the building.

HEART OF THE CAMPUS

HEART OF THE CAMPUS

HEART OF THE CAMPUS