Tag Archives: Architecture

Royal College of Art – Terrazzo Floor

‘Celebrating Pattern in London’s Architecture’.

‘Frieze collaborates with Tate Britain, the National Gallery, RCA, Sketch Gallery and ICA on the 2017 marketing campaign. From contemporary concepts to Renaissance painting, we have worked with important cultural institutions to create the campaigns for Frieze London and Frieze Masters 2017. Showcasing striking design and beautiful floors around London. Photography by Luke Hayes with Art Direction by Amy Preston’. Frieze London 2017.

Royal College of Art, Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

I was delighted to see my work featured in the Frieze London 2017 Marketing Campaign. My in-situ polychrome terrazzo and cut marble floor was quietly celebrating it’s 30th Anniversary in 2017, since it was commissioned by the RCA for the main entrance and reception of the new Darwin Building in 1987. The work was manufactured and installed by Diespeker & Co. I worked closely throughout in collaboration with Diespeker’s and the RCA. As stated – I was surprised and delighted to see it featured again in this way.

I recently made contact with the Photographer Luke Hayes to enquire about any other images he may have of the work, which didn’t make the original campaign. He has generously allowed me access to these images, which I reproduce here with his kind permission. I have very few images myself – and no digital images – and appear to have very little by way of documentation. I graduated from the RCA in 1985 and I think I was commissioned whilst I was still a post-grad student in Ceramics. This makes some sense, as the design for the floor was very much an extension of the work I was doing in ceramics, which was focussed on Architectural form and decoration. I was pretty amazed to see it was still in such good condition. Terrazzo is an amazing material and I have used it-  rather sporadically I admit – throughout my career and had the pleasure of working alongside some amazing craftspeople at Diespeker’s and Pallam Precast,  now part of Quality Marble.

 

Royal College of Art 1987. Darwin Building. Jay Mews Entrance. Terrazzo Floor. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Unknown

 

Above: From what I can recall, this  (poor quality) image was taken just after the final grinding & completion of the floor by Diespeker’s. It hadn’t been cleaned or polished and was very dusty – just like me in the image.

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017 (Cropped Image 2019)

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017 (Cropped Image 2019)

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

Royal College of Art, London. Detail: Terrazzo & Marble floor installed 1987. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: Luke Hayes 2017

 

Between 1985 / 87 during the delivery of this project, I had no access to digital processes or computers – although they had recently started to appear at the RCA. The original artwork was hand drawn and painted in gouache. Templates for the timber formwork were first drawn up full scale and processed in the RCA’s timber workshops on Jay Mews. I suppose what it did, was reinforce the hand made and craft process associated with the manufacture of the work. I do remember sanding off the tip of one of my fingers in the workshop. I had so little money in those post student days, that I also recall walking all the way from Terrazzo manufacturer Diespeker’s old premises at Diespeker Wharf Wharf, Islington, back to my old studio at Loughborough Junction on Coldharbour Lane, South London, carrying a pile of terrazzo samples.

 

Below: Really interesting to work briefly with Luke’s images to re-imagine some new designs for the same floor. Digital processes we have instantly available in minutes today would have taken me days to produce similar painted patterns in 1987.

 

RCA Re-imagined artwork for terrazzo & marble floor 2019 from original image by Photographer: Luke Hayes 2017

 

RCA Re-imagined artwork for terrazzo & marble floor 2019 from original image by Photographer: Luke Hayes 2017

 

RCA Re-imagined artwork for terrazzo & marble floor 2019 from original image by Photographer: Luke Hayes 2017

 

RCA Re-imagined artwork for terrazzo & marble floor 2019 from original image by Photographer: Luke Hayes 2017

 

RCA Re-imagined artwork for terrazzo & marble floor 2019 from original image by Photographer: Luke Hayes 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Installed !

They are finally in place! The architectural glazed screens have now been installed in the Hydrotherapy Pool room at the new RNHRD & Therapies Centre at the RUH in Bath.

 

Detail of the East Glazing Screen, seen from behind the interior scaffolding. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

On Tuesday 19th March 2019, the screens were carefully installed by SEH Commercial. The East Screen was installed in the morning and the North Screen in the afternoon. Proto Glass Studios delivered the 18 sealed units – a total of 42 sqm of decorated glass –  in two runs from their premises in Pewsey, Wiltshire. I couldn’t be there, which was a real disappointment, but the process was documented by a number of people on site. I am showing their images here.

There is still a fair amount of work to be done in finishing the new buildings, both inside & out, so for now and the foreseeable future at least, the glass will be covered by boards & protected. These are the last images we will see before the building is officially opened.

This project has been a great journey to make in collaboration with a wonderful project team. Hetty Dupays, director of Art at the Heart of the RUH who commissioned the work has been a most supportive project manager. Also a big thanks to Gina Sargeant, Head of Therapies & Clinical Site, whose direct and pragmatic approach was balanced by her humour. I could not have delivered this artwork without the input and advocacy of both these brilliant people. A massive thanks to all staff and patients from both the RUH and RHNRD (The Min), IBI Group Architects & Main Contractor Kier who collaborated throughout, and who offered their support and experience.

 

Detail of the East Glazing Screen, seen from behind the interior scaffolding. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail: External elevation of the North Screen from the Courtyard Garden. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

External elevation of the North Screen from the Courtyard Garden. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail of the topmost panels of the East Glazing Screen, seen from behind the interior scaffolding. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail of the topmost panels of the East Glazing Screen, seen from behind the interior scaffolding. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail of the lower panels of the East Glazing Screen, seen from behind the interior scaffolding. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail of the topmost panels of the East Glazing Screen, seen from behind the interior scaffolding. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail: External elevation of the North Screen from the Courtyard Garden. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail: External elevation of the North Screen from the Courtyard Garden. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Hetty Dupays standing in front of the East Screen. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Gina Sargeant

 

Hetty Dupays standing in front of the East Screen. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Gina Sargeant

 

The external wall elevations and frames are still in progress, as are the interiors and the Screens will be padded out and boarded up from today, to protect them during the remaining works on site.

 

SEH Commercial & Kier were responsible for the installation of the Screens. Stepladder & install team in front of the East Screen. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

External elevations of the East Screen. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail: External elevation of the East Screen. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

 

Detail: External elevation of the East Screen. Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH. Image: Hetty Dupays

Salisbury District Hospital 2006

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern

I am always trying to play catch-up with projects I completed prior to having any online platforms. Here we are, almost 13 years since its completion and installation and I have finally managed to track down a great set of images, which were commissioned by Tarkett Flooring (actually it was Tarkett Marley back in 2006). The images were originally commissioned by PR Firm Mainspring from photographer Ian Blantern of Blantern & Davis Photography.

Ian Blantern retrieved the images from his archive, for which I am really grateful.

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Images Screenshot. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern

In 2004 I was commissioned by Peter Ursem, a former director of the Artcare Team at Salisbury District Hospital to collaborate with project team Architects, Chapman Taylor and Contractor Gleeson. The brief was to create bespoke flooring installations throughout the four levels of the new building, combined with creating interior colour schemes to assist in wayfinding and identity. I collaborated closely with Tarkett Marley Floors throughout the design and manufacturing period on sonic cutting and installation methods.

Salisbury District Hospital Phase Two 2006 Chapman Taylor Architects. Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern

“The planned move of services from the older southern end of the Salisbury District Hospital site to a new modern purpose built facility took place in May 2006. The new building which was designed using the views of local people and staff houses the regional burns service, elderly care and orthopaedic wards. It also has an outpatient department with plastic surgery, maxillo facial outpatients, laser treatment centre and therapy services. This was the largest development seen on this site since Phase One of the hospital was built in1993 and means that these services now have natural links with the acute and diagnostic services in the newer part of the hospital. The new burns accommodation is situated on level four and has its own dedicated operating theatre. It is located near the Intensive Therapy Unit so that it can access critical care support for people with serious burn injuries. Orthopaedics has its own purpose built accommodation and this is located on level four of the new building close to main theatres. Plastic surgery and maxillo facial outpatients has its own department on level three, so that it links in with general outpatient and diagnostic services on the same level in the existing hospital. Medical and elderly wards are situated on level two, with two elderly care wards taking the vacated ward areas in the existing hospital that are next to the Nunton Unit, which provides physiotherapy. In designing the new building, the aim was to maximise natural daylight and ensure that patients in ward areas can enjoy excellent views across the Wiltshire countryside”. Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust

 

The designs were inspired by abstract forms in the Wiltshire landscape – ephemeral and or suggested elements as seen from the Hospital. This included ancient and historic man-made stone circles at Avebury and Sarum, crop circles, dew ponds, Fovant Badges, plough lines and field patterns. I also looked at Downton lace making, the architecture and decoration of Salisbury Cathedral and the flora and fauna of a chalk and limestone landscape. Engagement with staff and patients was also undertaken. The installations were made at major node points such as nurses stations, waiting areas, key vistas and in the window seating areas of the 4-bed bays. The patterns break up the generous expanses of floor, providing an element of surprise and distraction for patients and visitors alike. All floors share a limited catalogue of motifs, but these are expressed via individual and distinct colour palettes on each level. Levels 1 & 2 share an set of earth and terracotta tones representing chalk marls and ploughed fields. Level 3 uses shades of green reminiscent of summer and farmland and woods, whilst on Level 4, blues and lilac colours reflect shifting skyscapes.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Material & colour-ways sample boards. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

What am I proposing?          

Looking at Wiltshire: A patchwork of pattern, texture and light

Designs inspired by man-made forms in the landscape –

Earthworks: Avebury – Old Sarum – Silbury Hill

Crop Circles

Dew Ponds

Chalk Drawings: Wiltshire Horses and Fovant Badges

Ploughing patterns

Field patterns

Designs inspired by local history, industry and architecture –

Downton Lace

Salisbury Cathedral

Medieval Ceramic Tiles

Romano British Mosaics

Celtic Patterns

Designs inspired by the unseen & ephemeral in the landscape –

The geology of Wiltshire

Fossils of the Chalk Downland of Wiltshire

Associated Flora and Fauna: Horseshoe Vetch and Adonis Blue

Fleeting expressions of light in shadow play

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding – inspection during installation. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 3 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 3 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 3 colour way-finding – inspection during installation. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Material & colour-ways sample boxes in progress at Clockwork Studios. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Research images taken at Salisbury District Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Research images taken at Salisbury Cathedral 2004. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Material & colour-ways sample box for Levels 1 & 2 in progress at Clockwork Studios. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Material & colour-ways sample box for Level 4 Burns Unit in progress at Clockwork Studios. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Research images taken at Salisbury Cathedral 2004. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding – inspection & cleaning underway during installation. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding – inspection & cleaning during installation. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Production Drawings of bespoke motifs by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Production Drawings of bespoke motifs by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Waste Materials from manufacturing at Tarkett Marley factory, Lenham, Kent. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Production Drawings of bespoke motifs by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding. Sample Panel by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

 

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 3 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Typical Production Plan Drawing of bespoke motifs & sites for Levels 1 & 2 by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Detail: Typical Production Plan Drawing of bespoke motifs & sites for Levels 1 & 2 by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Typical Production Plan Drawing of bespoke motifs & sites for Level 4 by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Typical Production Plan Drawing of bespoke motifs & sites for Level 3 by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding – inspection during installation. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

2005, design stage consultation event. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

2005, design stage consultation event. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Production Drawings of bespoke motifs for Levels 1 & 2 by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 3 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Levels 1 & 2 colour way-finding. Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Ian Blantern Photography

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006. Material & colour-ways sample boxes in progress at Clockwork Studios. Artist Christopher Tipping.

Research images taken at Salisbury District Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Research images taken at Salisbury District Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Salisbury District Hospital 2006, Level 4 colour way-finding. Sample Panel by Tarkett Marley. Artist Christopher Tipping.

 

Decoration for the Hydrotherapy Pool Glazing …hello deer !

I imagined an abstracted landscape as a positive  way of encapsulating all that has inspired my commission for the Hydrotherapy Pool glazed screens. (There are approximately 46sqm of glass combined in both screens).

Both Hospital sites were originally set in and adjacent to open fields and expansive views of countryside. Easy to imagine then how beneficial this must have been to those patients and staff who experienced this.

It is now commonly understood that exposure to natural spaces, planting and nature within medical and healing environments is of great benefit and assists in the recovery and positive experience of patients and staff alike.

Deer with Roman pattern. Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

This glass landscape is populated with recognisable motifs, such as flowers, deer and trees, woven together with abstract forms and repeating patterns. Local landmarks such as Kelston Round Hill also feature, as do references to the architectural decoration and built heritage of The Min and its archaic Roman Mosaics. However, the most visible motif perhaps is water, and more explicitly, the gestural movement of water as shaped by those taking treatment in the Hydrotherapy Pool. A shape made in water informed by the movement of a hand or leg. Abstractions of steam or mist appear to hover in this landscape. Water is contained within a bowl or pool. An elegant but dynamic abstract splash of water drifts across the whole of the East Screen. The connection to hot springs and flowing waters has shaped Bath into the World Heritage Site we see today.

I have been so impressed with the positivity and care of the medical staff delivering these services, I wanted to evoke this caring nature with visual clues within the work, which may express this. Growing flowers and creating gardens is a nurturing vocation. Water is an elemental part of this.  Historically, The Min was built upon the grounds of the first Theatre in Bath, and the later extension built upon the formal gardens of Rectory House. Adjacent to the ChapeI at the rear of The Min is a small but lovely garden. Also in Bath, Gibbes Garden was a 15th Century apothecary garden growing medicinal herbs.

Combe Park had formerly been the site of the Bath War Hospital built in 1916 to provide beds and medical services for WW1 Casualties. There was a small pond and a stream ran nearby. Patients and staff were encouraged to grow and maintain flower gardens & were rewarded with prizes.

I was offered a session at the Hydrotherapy Pool at The Min as a way of understanding a little more about the impact of water as a treatment. I am not a patient – I cannot experience this as many do on a daily basis, not I am I in the process of healing or tempering acute conditions. Patients vary from those with lifelong conditions, such as Ankylosing spondylitis and others suffering from chronic pain, to physiotherapy in the pool following operations or broken limbs.  All I can aim for is to add to the interior space with something visually interesting / beautiful / stimulating to this brand-new environment, which makes the experience for both staff and patients a pleasant and perhaps an intriguing one.

The following images make up the final draft artwork approved for production by the RUH. The Magenta/Pink colour is used to indicate clear/fully transparent glazing with no artwork. White represents sandblasting and / or Ceramic Etch techniques. All other colour is created using Screen-printed Ceramic Colour fired onto the glass. The artwork is applied to the two inner faces of a double glazed sealed unit. There is a subtle overlaying of motifs, which means that the artwork is slightly different as seen from the interior, than the exterior. These drafts are created initially via hand drawing and assembled and finished in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Final Master Draft for the North and East Glazed Screens. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing colour & patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen detail 4. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen detail 3. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Iris drawing. Research drawings developing motifs and patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen detail 2. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Donkey with pattern. Research Images developing motifs & patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Orange. Research Images developing motifs, patterns & colours from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the North Glazed Screen detail 1. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the North Glazed Screen detail 2. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the North Glazed Screen detail 3. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft 16 Foil shape with Foxgloves. Research drawings developing motifs & patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Flower Bowl Images from Rockpanel

My great collaborators at Rockpanel have just sent me a new set of images they have commissioned of The Flower Bowl Entertainment Centre at Brock, near Preston.

The wonderful images are by Daniel James Alive Photography.

I was commissioned by Guy Topping MD of Barton Grange Garden Centre to create the cnc routed artwork for the external Rockpanel rainscreen facade.

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

Rockpanel put me in touch with Barton Grange following our work with HLM Architects on their ‘Heart of the Campus’ project for Sheffield Hallam University. I was then commissioned by Guy Topping to design artwork to be integrated into the exterior cladding, which wraps the façade of the Flower Bowl. The client was keen to reference its long association with plants, trees and especially flowers. The artwork is therefore a celebration of flowers inspired not so much by botanical accuracy, rather their abstract super graphic nature at large scale, exploding like fireworks in celebration across the elevations of the building.

The façades are specified in Rockpanel Colours in RAL 7022, routed to reveal the design, which was created in collaboration with Mark Durey at The Cutting Room, Huntingdon, using Alphacam CAD CAM software.

The translation of my artwork to the end product is anything but straightforward. Mark’s intimate knowledge of the technology, combined with his experience in creative problem solving, brings an entirely bespoke method to creating the final installation. The final outcome is exceptionally accurate.

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

‘The Flower Bowl is an innovative multi-use leisure destination, which sits alongside Barton Grange Garden Centre and Barton Grange Marina at Brock, near Preston in Lancashire. 

The Topping family run the Barton Grange Group which owns and operate the Garden Centre, Marina and Flower Bowl and whose history spans back more than seventy years. The company runs several award-winning garden centres, a 4 star hotel and a widely respected and successful landscape contracting firm.

The architects for the project were Worthington Ashworth Jackson Walker (WAJW). They faced several challenges in accommodating the large number of disparate facilities with potentially conflicting requirements in close proximity. WAJW Architect Alistair Williams, “The single greatest challenge was to master the complex geometry of the vast, undulating roof and to detail this in such a way that it could be accurately replicated on site.” The 4200m2 single storey structure now features that gently undulating grass roof that, it is hoped, will eventually have sheep grazing on it’. Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

The Flower Bowl cnc routed facade artwork. Image: Daniel James Alive Photography by kind permission of Rockpanel

 

RUH Hydrotherapy Pool Artwork – What am I doing?

Drawing drafts for moving water and gestural motifs developing patterns from research at the RNHRD and RUH Hydrotherapy Units. Artist: Christopher Tipping

There are many threads of research and interest which have influenced the development and visual narrative of the artwork. The following notes and lists are from my own notebooks, where I  made records of research sessions and information which struck me as inspirational. 

The Mineral Water Hospital, affectionately known as The Min, was built in 1742 & overlooked open, ‘quiet fields’ and countryside. The Hospital was constructed on the site of Bath’s first Theatre of 1705, by the Architect George Trim, whose Mother was, apparently the sister of the Kings Architect, Inigo Jones. The theatre was demolished 1738.

This theatrical & dramatic connection has influenced the concept of using the glazed Hydrotherapy screens as inspirational painted backdrops – a way of creatively setting the scene within the new space & enhancing the experience of staff and patients using the Pool.

In 1859, with great ceremony, the foundation stone was laid for a new hospital building adjacent to the original site and built upon the grounds of a ‘large formal garden belonging to the Parsonage of St Peter Paul Parish’. This garden is shown on the John Speed map of 1610.

The new Royal United Hospital was built in open fields at Combe Park in 1932 (having moved from central Bath). Combe Park had formerly been the site of the Bath War Hospital built in 1916 to provide beds and medical services for WW1 Casualties. There was a small pond and a stream ran nearby. Patients and staff were encouraged to grow and maintain flower gardens & were rewarded with prizes.

Aerial view of the RUH sitting amidst green fields circa 1932 having moved to this site at Weston Manor from the centre of Bath. Image by kind permission of Bath in Time and Bath War Hospital at the RUH.

In the Building Report on The Mineral Water Hospital, by The House Historians, March 2006, there is a detailed report on The Chapel, (now the home of Bath Medical Museum)and its architectural decorations.

This mentions a number of plants seen in carvings, stained glass and other architectural details, which are wonderfully useful in referencing the legacy of The Min, when it finally closes its doors to move to the RUH site:

Ivy

Oak

Water Buttercup

Wild Poppy

Fig

Vines

White Lilies

Passion Flower

Pomegranate

Hyssop

 

Colour and pattern used within the stained glass is also influential. Patterns are influenced by the architectural decoration and tiling of The Min Chapel.

Various hydrotherapy treatments, methods and equipment as described as being newly installed in 1915 following extensive alterations, are also very evocative and inspire some abstract interpretation within my creative narrative.

 

Deep Baths

Aix and Vichy Douches

Scotch and Needle Douches

Reclining and Vapour Baths

Radiant Heat Baths

Sulpher Baths of Potassium Sulphide

Mineral Water Baths

Whirlpool Bath

Hubbard Tank to treat the entire body simultaneously

 

‘A Vichy Massage required the patient to stand on a rubber covered slab whilst showered with jets of hot mineral water. The needle bath was a circular shower with an array of horizontal pipes which sprayed fine jets of water’.

Descriptions of the Coat of Arms for the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases – to give The Min its formal & proper title, is a useful source of colour references, decorative motifs, plants, animals and their meaning.

Black

White for truth, sincerity, peace, innocence and purity

Green

Blue

Purple

Circlet of Fountains

Foxglove

Hares

Meadow Saffron

I like the colour of evening sky, that particular shade of indigo blue.

Water is by turns fluid and abstract, vaporous & ephemeral, contained within many shapes – rivers, ponds, streams, pools, baths, glasses & oceans – any number of vessels.

My creative approach is making connections between place & historic legacy, hydrotherapy practice and an imaginary landscape, which may be conjured up whilst being treated in the pool & feeling the benefits of floating & exercising, whilst being supported by warm water and the care and assistance and encouragement of staff.

‘This hospital was to be entirely self-funded, and even before the hospital was built the raising of monies for it began in earnest. Bath’s Master of Ceremonies, Richard Beau Nash arranged balls and collected subscriptions; wills, donations and even bequests of a diamond, and 1,000 oranges, contributed to the coffers. The list of donors reads like a Who’s Who of 18th century Bath society. Those who donated £40 or more were invited to become a hospital governor, including the artist William Hoare and the actor David Garrick’.

https://thebathmagazine.co.uk/finding-the-cure/

 

 

Map on framed canvas. Mrs. Oliver inscribed on reverse. Showing location of Weston Manor prior to incorporation into Royal United Hospital. Image: By kind permission Bath War Hospital at the RUH

This Estate Map above – date unknown – shows the private estate of Weston Manor before the RUH incorporated it into its site in the 20th Century.

‘The hospital moved to its present site, Combe Park, on 11 December 1932. The site had previously been used for the large First World War Bath War Hospital which opened in 1916. In November 1919 it was renamed the Bath Ministry of Pensions Hospital, which it remained until it closed in 1929.

The site was also used by the Forbes Fraser Hospital and the Bath and Wessex Orthopaedic Hospital, both founded in 1924 and which merged into the RUH about 1980. The former manor house on the site, originally medieval but remodelled in the 18th century, became an administrative building. The building is a Grade II* listed building due to its fine Adam style interior’. Wikipedia

Image: Early Draft artwork for North & East Screens. March 2018 RUH HYDROTHERAPY. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artworks: Interior detailing explored for the Hydrotherapy Pool – new Therapies Unit, RUH, Bath. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artworks: Interior detailing explored for the Hydrotherapy Pool – new Therapies Unit, RUH, Bath. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artworks: Interior detailing explored for the North Screen of the Hydrotherapy Pool – new Therapies Unit, RUH, Bath. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artworks: Interior detailing explored for the East Screen of the Hydrotherapy Pool – new Therapies Unit, RUH, Bath. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images from the RNHRD, The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images from the RNHRD, The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images from the RNHRD, Roman Mosaic from the basement excavations of The Min Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping




 

Hydrotherapy Pool, Royal United Hospital, Bath – new Therapies Centre

Draft Artwork: Interior with architectural glazed screens – Christopher Tipping

External draft artwork detail of the Hydrotherapy Pool. Image: Christopher Tipping

I was commissioned by Art at the Heart of the RUH in December 2017 to create artwork in response to the architectural glazing in the Hydrotherapy Pool room at the new Therapies Centre for the Royal United Hospital, Bath. These architectural glass panels are floor to ceiling glazed apertures with a combined 46.40 sq m of glass. I am working in collaboration with PROTO GLASS STUDIOS, Architectural Glass Decorators.

The project is being delivered by Kier Construction Ltd with Architects IBI Group

We have also been engaged with a large group of stakeholders, including staff and service users, some of whom have been are lifelong patients at the RNHRD & RUH. This is an ongoing process and we are taking everyone on the journey with us.

‘FLOW’

“Flow is active. It is not just the water, but it is the way our muscles are warmed and released, allowing blood to flow more freely. It is the freedom from stiffness of joints, when even a centimetre gained is a big triumph. It is active horizontally and not vertically. My spine is fully arthrosed and I cannot turn my head. This is a fundamental problem for AS patients and one of the big exercises in the pool and the gym is trying to turn and look over your shoulder without moving your body. That is flow. It is horizontal”. George Odam RNHRD Lifelong Patient with Ankylosing spondylitis (AS), speaking about his personal journey and experience of hydrotherapy treatment in 2017.

The Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (RNHRD) and The Brownsword Therapies Centre (BTC)

The new RNHRD and BTC will be built close to the main entrance of the Royal United Hospital or RUH; it will be an outpatient centre providing treatment, care and education for patients to recover from episodes of illness or injury, or to manage their long-term condition. The new building will house many of the services currently located at the RNHRD (also known as The Mineral Hospital/ The Min) and the existing RUH therapies and pain management services located in RUH North, under one roof. The Centre will create a centralised and integrated space for staff to work collaboratively, delivering a holistic and patient-centred approach to care.

Old Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH Bath. Image: Christopher Tipping

Hydrotherapy Pool at The Royal Mineral Water Hospital, RNHRD, Bath, 2018. Image:Christopher Tipping

Rubber Ducks at the Hydrotherapy Pool at The Royal Mineral Water Hospital, RNHRD, Bath, 2018. Image: Christopher Tipping

Objects at the Hydrotherapy Pool at The Royal Mineral Water Hospital, RNHRD, Bath, 2018. Image: Christopher Tipping

Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath. Image: Christopher Tipping

Pediment of the Royal Mineral Water Hospital, Bath, aka The Min 2018. Image: Christopher Tipping

The Min, as the RNHRD is affectionately known, has a small Medical Museum situated in the Old Chapel.  It is a fascinating collection and curated and managed by a small group of dedicated and enthusiastic people, who allowed me access to the photographic Archives. This was very much appreciated.

‘In 2012 the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases [The Mineral Hospital] opened a small museum to showcase their collection. Now, with the imminent closure of the hospital in the centre of Bath, our museum has been granted custody of the Collection of the Min, which includes records dating back to the 1740s, artefacts, the paintings and other pieces of art from around the Hospital, memorabilia, and photographs relating to rheumatology, medicine and pharmacy’

A Hubbard Tank was used for entire body treatments in Hydrotherapy. Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

Patient taking a Nauheim effervescent bath, date unknown – Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

Vichy spray massage treatment. Date unknown – Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

Brass identity medallions worn by patients in the 18th Century. Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

 

 

…and a walk into Ashton-Under-Lyne

Friday 26th February 2016 – Ashton-Under-Lyne

What caught my eye walking into Ashton-Under-Lyne was the architectural legacy of an industrial past. Robust brick architecture with exuberant and self-confident detailing.

Industrial brick architecture in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Industrial brick architecture in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Industrial brick architecture and ironwork in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Industrial brick architecture and ironwork in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Industrial brick architecture and ironwork in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Industrial brick architecture and ironwork in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Metro Cinema - built 1920. Architectural Faience. Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Metro Cinema – built 1920. Architectural Faience. Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

This is an amazing building – wonderful architectural faience ! It occupies a corner site with another fully glazed elevation.

Spectacular & robust doorway. Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Spectacular & robust doorway. Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Architecture in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Architecture in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Decorative Architectural Ironwork, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Decorative Architectural Ironwork, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Elongated doorway - Architecture of Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Elongated doorway – Architecture of Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Architecture & Streets of Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Architecture & Streets of Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Camden House built 1851, No.2 Grey Street, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Camden House built 1851, No.2 Grey Street, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Corner building, Stamford Street, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Corner building, Stamford Street, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Signage in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Signage in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Commercial Building, Architecture of Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Commercial Building, Architecture of Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Commercial or Warehouse Building, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Commercial or Warehouse Building, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Patterns of Architecture in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

Patterns of Architecture in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

St Michael and All Angels Church of England, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

St Michael and All Angels Church of England, Ashton-Under-Lyne. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

 

 

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton

24th January 2015

Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England was supposed to be doing the honours today at the Official Opening of the Jubilee Building, but for unforeseen reasons he couldn’t come !

His place was taken by the local MP Jeremy Browne, who was able to stand in at very short notice. I am sure that everyone was disappointed not to have the head honcho in attendance. Everyone has worked incredibly hard on the project, from the Trusts’s Capital Projects team, BDP Architects and BAM  to medical and ancillary staff. However, it was a lovely day all round and the weather was perfect for showing off the building.

This was the first time that I had seen both my projects – ‘70 years on…” & ‘Murmuration’ fully installed. I couldn’t have asked for a better day to see them. The Art for Life team, led by Lisa Harty have done an amazing job in co-ordinating and presenting the work. I am very grateful to them.

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

Jo Cubbon, Chief Executive Officer at Musgrove Park Hospital, with Jeremy Browne MP at the Official Opening Ceremony.

The Celebration Table at Musgrove Park Hospital had a cupcake mountain on it - not for long ! Image: Christopher Tipping

The Celebration Table at Musgrove Park Hospital had a cupcake mountain on it – not for long ! Image: Christopher Tipping

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

From left to right – Chris Cutting from the League of Friends, Colin Drummond, Chair of the Trust, Jo Cubbon, Chief Executive Officer & Jeremy Browne MP

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

Official Opening of the Jubilee Building at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. Image: Christopher Tipping

'Murmuration', by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘Murmuration’, by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'Murmuration', by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘Murmuration’, by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: 'Murmuration', by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ‘Murmuration’, by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'Murmuration', by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘Murmuration’, by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'Murmuration', by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘Murmuration’, by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'Murmuration', by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘Murmuration’, by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Interpretation poster for the tensile artwork '70 years on...' Jubilee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Artist: Christopher Tipping Poster:Colourtone (Taunton) Ltd

Interpretation poster for the tensile artwork ’70 years on…’ Jubilee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital. Artist: Christopher Tipping
Poster:Colourtone (Taunton) Ltd

'70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ was manufactured & installed by Architen Landrell with digital printing by VGL

'70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

'70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Digital Printing onto vinyl mesh fabric applied to a stainless steel and aluminium ladder frame to create the tensile screen.

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: '70 years on...' by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Detail: ’70 years on…’ by Christopher Tipping commissioned for the Jubliee Building Central Concourse, Musgrove Park Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping