Tag Archives: Jack Harrison VC

Jack Harrison VC – Harrison Park, Hull

Wednesday 3rd May 2017 

This new development of 64 Extra Care Apartments at Orchard Park, recently delivered in April this year by The Riverside Group is called ‘Harrison Park’, 100 years after Jack Harrison VC  a former Hull FC Rugby League Star was killed at Oppy Wood,  Arras, France in 1917 during the First World War.

Today – the 3rd May 2017 marks the day all four Hull Pals Battalions took part on the attack on Oppy Wood.

This event & others relating to WW1 are remembered on the 14-18-NOW WW! CENTENARY ART COMMISSIONS website.

A Pinterest Board of research images about Orchard Park and its history, can be found here. 

Hull is currently celebrating City of Culture 2017 statusso there is much to do and see there ! –

Detail: Glazing Vinyl installation Harrison Park, Hall Rd, Hull Extra Care. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Detail: Glazing Vinyl installation Harrison Park, Hall Rd, Hull Extra Care. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Harrison Park, Hall Road, Hull – Part 1

Harrison Park, Hall Road, Hull

An Extra Care Facility by Riverside

Click on this link HARRISON PARK, HALL ROAD CREATIVE CONTEXTUAL DOCUMENT to view the research based contextual concept draft for the project – 

The Glazing Vinyl Artworks are presented as a series of abstract & figurative elements based upon a number of historic land maps, including the 1816 plan of Cottingham Common showing historic field patterns, each of which is annotated with the names of the individual landowner and /or tenant farmer.

The Inclosure Act of 1766 transformed this ill-drained common meadow and pasture, which was subject to seasonal flooding from the tidal River Hull, into a landscape of sluices, dykes, drains and ditches, the names of which, will be familiar to many of you now.

Concept development drawing for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Image: National Library of Scotland OS Map of 1911 with Artist drawing overlaid. Artist: Christopher Tipping

The 1886 hand drawn map of Coldharbour Farm, on North Carr Lane -now Orchard Park Road, in the collection of the Hull History Centre, shows the individual fields held by the tenant farmer, which were farmed until the new estate was built in 1963. This new building on Hall Road, part of the Orchard Park Estate, sits within the original boundary of the farm.

Concept development drawing for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Image: Field Patterns & Textures. Artist: Christopher Tipping

It is this historic landscape and community which provides a ‘frame’ of support and a visual reference for the artworks, reflecting the fact that there has been a continuous system of land & water management and farming, in turn supporting a community on this site since medieval times.

The artwork builds a bridge to the past and also acts as a threshold between the external and internal landscapes of the building. The outlines of plants, suggest those which may have grown in the waterways and fields of the area – Flowering Rush, Floating Pondweed,

Dyers Greenweed, Birds Foot Trefoil, Marsh Marigold, Cowslip, Common Daisy and Stinking Cranesbill. The Field Pattern geometry works as a scaffold device to hold these detailed drawings together, with its suggestion of green fields, ponds, clouds and textures.

The whole artwork is kept rigidly in place via the deep architectural window frames, which impose a vertical and horizontal symmetry to the view.

Concept development drawing for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Image: Field Patterns & Textures. Artist: Christopher Tipping

The use of areas of clear, transparent glazing is very much a part of the intention of the work, allowing views both from and into the building, whilst further animating and providing a backdrop of external colour and texture to illuminate and make visible, the cut-out detailing of the artwork.

The Field Pattern is further used to inspire and give form to a wall-hung cabinet, to be known as the Field Cabinet, which can be used as an ordinary bookshelf as well as a cabinet of curiosity containing references to the history and locality of the new building.

End