Tag Archives: Public Art

Jack Harrison VC – Harrison Park, Hull

Wednesday 3rd May 2017 

This new development of 64 Extra Care Apartments at Orchard Park, recently delivered in April this year by The Riverside Group is called ‘Harrison Park’, 100 years after Jack Harrison VC  a former Hull FC Rugby League Star was killed at Oppy Wood,  Arras, France in 1917 during the First World War.

Today – the 3rd May 2017 marks the day all four Hull Pals Battalions took part on the attack on Oppy Wood.

This event & others relating to WW1 are remembered on the 14-18-NOW WW! CENTENARY ART COMMISSIONS website.

A Pinterest Board of research images about Orchard Park and its history, can be found here. 

Hull is currently celebrating City of Culture 2017 statusso there is much to do and see there ! –

Detail: Glazing Vinyl installation Harrison Park, Hall Rd, Hull Extra Care. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Detail: Glazing Vinyl installation Harrison Park, Hall Rd, Hull Extra Care. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit – Part 1

I made my last visit to site on 13th March 2017 – to see the artworks fully installed. The interiors throughout the new unit are all completed, fully furnished and operational and the first clinics were to be held the very next day. Tameside Macmillan Unit  Willis Newson

No more words – only images –

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit at Tameside Hospital – Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the main corridor bespoke wallcovering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering & timber handrail. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering & solid timber handrail. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering & solid timber handrail. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Glazed Partition Screens …

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens following the installation of the glazed panels. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: The Printed Film Company

Detail of one of the Glazed Partition Screens against a backdrop of the printed wallcovering. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

The artwork proposals extend to and include a series of glazed partition screens situated along one side of the main corridor, opposite the large-scale bespoke wallcovering, which itself acts as a grand backdrop to the new unit. The screens however, can be viewed from both sides, extending the reach of the artwork, which becomes something of a ‘theatre in the round’, presenting multiple viewing points and visual ‘conversations’ & interplay, not only with the artwork, but with the wider architectural scheme and interiors. The brief called for these screens to have the artwork encapsulated as a printed laminate between layers of safety glass. I collaborated with both VGL and The Printed Film Company on this element of the work.

The Printed Film Company described their brief as:

“We were asked to supply decorative laminated safety glass partitions in the main corridor; 6mm + 6mm low iron toughened glass, PVB laminated encapsulating our optically clear PET interlayer, on which we digitally printed the required designs to give pleasing environmental visuals along with manifestation. We procured the glass, printed the interlayer’s and managed the lamination process before delivering the laminated panels to site for installation”.

There are some lovely images of the work on their website –

The glazing panels were fitted into timber frames by the Macmillan Project main contractors, John Turner Construction Group

Draft design for glazed partition screen to main corridor. Image: Christopher Tipping

Draft design for glazed partition screen to main corridor. Image: Christopher Tipping

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens prior to the installation of the glazed panels. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens following the installation of the glazed panels. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: The Printed Film Company

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens following the installation of the glazed panels. Artist: Christopher Tipping. Image: The Printed Film Company

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens following the installation of the glazed panels. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens prior to the installation of the glazed panels. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the Timber Partition Screens following the installation of the glazed panels. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

This image also shows the print-white vinyl manifestations applied to the external glazing. These panels provided a much needed interface between the interior paces and the black brick wall outside.

Draft design for 2 glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: Christopher Tipping

Draft designs for 4 glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: Christopher Tipping

Areas of optically clear glazing, with no artwork are shown here – images above and below – in black.

Draft designs for 2 glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production design draft for 4 glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: VGL

This colour image forms part of the production design detailing and indicates – via darker and lighter magenta tones, the opacity and translucency of a white interlayer, which has colour printed on both sides. The darker the tone, the more opaque the colour.

Production design technical draft for 4 glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: The Printed Film Co

The image above, illustrates the same process described earlier whereby the print-white layer creates the opacity and transparency of the final colour artwork – in this instance the degrees of print-white are indicated in shades of blue.

A wide range of samples were produced to achieve the right balance of translucent and opaque colour.

Production related design samples design for glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production related glass design samples by The Printed Film Company for the glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

Production related glass design samples by The Printed Film Company for the glazed partition screens to the main corridor. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

Detail of one of the Glazed Partition Screens against a backdrop of the printed wallcovering. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

Detail of one of the Glazed Partition Screens against a backdrop of the printed wallcovering. Image: Bronwen Gwillim

 

 

Chemotherapy Treatment Room

16th January 2017

Draft design for the Tameside ‘landscape’ of 5 interrelated & double-sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

The Chemotherapy Treatment Room within the New Macmillan Unit at Tameside and Glossop Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust will feature five retractable ‘pull-out’ privacy screens manufactured by Kwickscreen, onto which artwork can be digitally printed. The flexible material for printing is an opaque, but translucent (if that makes sense!) crisp white vinyl. We have proposed a series of artworks inspired by the theme originally drawn out in the main corridor artwork & also by the new planting and design of the adjacent external courtyard designed by Olivia Kirk Gardens. The large windows of the Treatment Room face directly into this newly refurbished and planted space.

It is unlikely that all the screens will be drawn out at the same time…what is more likely is that smaller sections of each screen may be visible at various times, creating an ever changing backdrop to the activity in the room.

A draft design for the Chemotherapy Treatment Room retractable privacy screen. Image: Kwickscreen / Christopher Tipping

Plan Drawing – A draft design for the 5 screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room featuring retractable privacy screens. Image: Christopher Tipping / IBI Group Architects

Draft design for the 5 double sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

1 of 5 – ‘Tameside Landscape’ of interrelated & double-sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

2 of 5 – ‘Tameside Landscape’ of interrelated & double-sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

3 of 5 – ‘Tameside Landscape’ of interrelated & double-sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

4 of 5 – ‘Tameside Landscape’ of interrelated & double-sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

5 of 5 – ‘Tameside Landscape’ of interrelated & double-sided retractable privacy screens in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Designs for production…

Monday 16th January 2017

We decided to keep the development and manufacture of the detailed site-specific artwork for the unit under wraps to allow for further consultation, production development and sampling etc. Since the last post 8 months ago now, things have really moved on!

Following design approvals and sign-off at the end of April 2016, we embarked on the detailed design work for production with VGL and other specialist contractors and suppliers.

We are collaborating with VGL on a broad range of digital designs, including a large scale polychrome bespoke Wallcovering to the Main Corridor and print-white Glazing Vinyls to the external glazing frames. VGL are further assisting us in the supply of digital production files for:

Laminated Glazed Screens being manufactured by The Printed Film Co 

Retractable Privacy Screens for the Chemotherapy Treatment Room, being manufactured and supplied by Kwickscreen.

The following images show some of this process, including building works, sampling and sample site-installations, testing the ideas. Many thanks to Architects IBI Group  and Main Contractors John Turner 

 

One that got away ! …Early drafts for undeveloped SuperGraphic signage / railing detail.

Draft for SuperGraphic signage / railing for the Macmillan Unit entrance by Christopher Tipping.

 

Draft for SuperGraphic signage / railing for the Macmillan Unit entrance by Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping / IBI Group Architects

Michael Hughes of IBI Group – our Project Architect, has however designed a brilliant new canopy entrance feature – not sure I can show that one just yet ! – but will get an image asap !

A large vocabulary of individual landscape inspired elements were developed for the project, using documentary photographs taken on my walk with Stewart & further drawings and studies made in the studio.

List of vector images and iconography developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Colour iconography / elements developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

As per usual in my practice, some of this iconography is part of a common language of ideas which appear throughout my work – some are original to this project, some may find their way into the next project. Some have migrated from a previous project. This is my original ‘handwriting’, and may offer clues to the driving elements which fuel my approach to any work.

Individual coloured iconography / element developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Individual coloured iconography / element developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Individual coloured landscape inspired iconography / element developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

How to make a DREAM STREAM – Individual coloured landscape inspired iconography / element developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

How to make A44.’DREAM STREAM’ – rules on creating an Individual coloured landscape inspired iconography / element developed for the new Tameside Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Study for REEDS – Individual iconography / inspired by Tameside Landscape, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Study for PLOUGH PATTERN – Individual iconography / inspired by Tameside Landscape, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Study for A66. LARGE GRITSTONE – Individual iconography / inspired by Tameside Landscape, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Screenshot of Bespoke Corridor WallCovering Production Artwork v1, inspired by a walk in the landscape of Tameside, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Screenshot of Bespoke Corridor WallCovering Production Artwork v1, inspired by a walk in the landscape of Tameside, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Screenshot of Bespoke Corridor WallCovering Production Artwork v1, inspired by a walk in the landscape of Tameside, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Screenshot of Bespoke Corridor WallCovering Production Artwork v1, inspired by a walk in the landscape of Tameside, developed for the New Macmillan Unit by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

The Whiteleaf Centre – Stage 2 completed

The Ward Round Rooms at the Whiteleaf Centre have now been completed.

VGL Ltd collaborated with me on the production design and then manufactured and installed the digitally printed artwork wall coverings.

Tom Cox of Artscape has managed the project from the outset. A big thanks for all his contribution and assistance with the project !

A few images of Amber, Sapphire and Ruby Ward Round Rooms – Opal Ward is still missing – but I will post some images as soon as they come in –

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Amber Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Sapphire Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room,  Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ward Round Room, Ruby Ward, Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury by Christopher Tipping. Image: Tom Cox

Ginger Beer anyone?

B. R. Phillips, Invicta Works, 22 – 24 Railway Street, Chatham, made Home Brewed Ginger Beer

‘Phillips Chatham Invicta Mineral Waterworks Unrivaled Brewed Ginger Beer’. !

D.J Whiffen, Invicta Mineral Waterworks, 22 – 24 Railway Street, Chatham

B.R. Philips made Home Brewed Ginger Beer at The Invicta Works, Nos 22 - 24 Railway Street - Chatham Placemaking Project - Chatham Patterns - Image: Christopher Tipping

B.R. Philips made Home Brewed Ginger Beer at The Invicta Works, Nos 22 – 24 Railway Street – Chatham Placemaking Project – Chatham Patterns – Image: Christopher Tipping

Railway Street from New Cut Viaduct date unknown. Collection of Rex Cadman. by Permission of Rex Cadman and Kent Photo Archive.

Railway Street from New Cut Viaduct date unknown. Collection of Rex Cadman. by Permission of Rex Cadman and Kent Photo Archive.

Nos. 20 - 26 Railway Street. Chatham Placemaking Project - Chatham Patterns - Image: Christopher Tipping

No. 26 Railway Street. In 1961, this was the premises of Frank Bannister & Son Ltd – Motor and Motorcycle Engineers. Chatham Placemaking Project – Chatham Patterns – Image: Christopher Tipping

In 1912 – No 26 was the home of the Invicta Furniture and Baggage Depository. No 28 was a Garage and Cycle Works.

Rome House, No 41 Railway Street. Chatham Placemaking Project - Chatham Patterns - Image: Christopher Tipping

Rome House, No 41 Railway Street. Chatham Placemaking Project – Chatham Patterns – Image: Christopher Tipping

The 1848 Ordnance Survey Public Health Map of Chatham shows Rome House – a large detached mansion set in landscaped gardens – opposite St John’s Church on Rome Lane. Following the building of Chatham Railway Station, Rome Lane became Railway Street sometime after 1871. No 41 would have been a new property named after the original house.

A detail from the 1848 OS Public Health Map of Chatham, with St John's Church and Rome House opposite on Rome Lane. The pink line shows the route of the railway and Chatham Railway Station opened in January 1858. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project.

A detail from the 1848 OS Public Health Map of Chatham, with St John’s Church and Rome House on Rome Lane at top right. The pink line shows the eventual route of the railway and Chatham Railway Station, which opened in January 1858. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project.

A detail of the OS Map of Chatham from 1864. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

A detail of the OS Map of Chatham from 1864. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

This detail of the OS 1864 Map of Chatham shows Chatham Station at the bottom of this image. Railway Street to Military Road runs from the middle of the image to the top of the image. St John’s Church and Rome House can clearly be seen.

Burton’s Elephant !

Halifax Building Society now occupy the Burton Art Deco Building on Military Road and High Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

Halifax Building Society now occupy the Burton Art Deco Building on Military Road and High Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

Halifax Building Society now occupy the former Burton Tailors Art Deco Building on Military Road and High Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

Halifax Building Society now occupy the former Burton Tailors Art Deco Building on Military Road and High Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Burton’s Tailors, Military Road, Chatham  – now the Halifax Building Society

“Burton’s long history in men’s clothing is a remarkable story. It was founded in 1903 by Montague Burton (originally named Meshe Osinsky), one of several Russian Jewish immigrants who built enormously successful businesses from humble beginnings.

Burton became a household name because of good public relations and the way it treated its workers. Burton bought shops in the prime town centre spots and were instantly recognisable because of their design. There were few men in England who didn’t at some time enter the portals of a Burton’s “gentlemen’s club” and get measured for a Burton suit.

On the eve of the 1939-45 war, Burton again turned to the production of uniforms for troops. After the war, Burton produced a suit for war veterans nicknamed “The Full Monty”. By the end of the war, Burton was estimated to be clothing around a fifth of British males.” On:Yorkshire Magazine 20th December 2012

The Art Deco Elephant motif on the building on Halifax Building on Military Road was common to all Burtons buildings throughout the 1930’s. It is a large and significant building in Chatham and one which assists in anchoring our site on the route from the Station to the Waterfront – not insignificantly because of it’s wonderful Elephant motif’s.

The Halifax Building Society now occupies the former Burton Art Deco Building on Military Road and High Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

The Halifax Building Society now occupies the former Burton Art Deco Building on Military Road and High Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham

Tuesday 10th May – 

St John’s Church on Railway Street Chatham, is a jewel in the crown of Chatham’s Architectural Heritage. It is certainly an important anchor site for us working on the Chatham Placemaking Project.

St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham 2015. Image: Christopher Tipping

St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham 2015. Image: Christopher Tipping

Maybe you don’t agree !

St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham 2015. Image: Christopher Tipping

St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham 2015. Image: Christopher Tipping

What about now…? No? 

St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham 2015. Image: Christopher Tipping

St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham 2015. Image: Christopher Tipping

A much better image in great light – showing off it’s tower and Italianate form. 

Built in 1820/21 by the Architect Sir Robert Smirkewho by the way also built the Facade and main block of the British Museum – the Grade II Listed Italianate Style Anglican Church is one of the few Waterloo Churches left intact.

The Church has been closed since the early 1990’s – but has in the interim been used for an arts installation – Chatham Vines  in 2006.

I only came to Chatham for the first time in 2015 to start work on the Chatham Placemaking Project – I loved the building from the start – with its robust symetric form and landmark tower. It is the anchor building along our route. However – those familiar with Chatham will know all too well the condition of the building today. It has been bypassed by most and is diminished by the constant flow of traffic and cut off from lower Railway Street and the town centre by the busy road. Stained glass windows are dark. The stone elevations are dirty. The paintwork on the doors is peeling. It is forlorn – but actually it has not been forgotten !

My images aren’t brilliant – but just take a look inside …

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Laura Knight of Francis Knight and I were accompanied by Project Manager Peter Welsh of the Diocese of Rochester. He had agreed to show us around & allowed us to take pictures whilst discussing the Chatham Placemaking Project and the importance of this building to our project. The building is still of importance to the Diocese too. ‘The strategic project at Chatham includes re-establishing a worshipping community for St John’s Church, bringing the building back into use (potentially with an interim solution) and establishing mission activities in the local community. The area around St John’s is one of the most deprived in the Diocese in terms of employment rates, income, education and quality of life’.

The interior is quite stunningly beautiful with interior furniture and finishes – albeit dirty and in need of repair & a little tlc – hardly touched since the day the doors were closed and locked. So much original detail and wonderful features remain, including bespoke benches and seating, lighting, plasterwork, ironwork and of course brilliantly coloured stained glass. Could you have guessed that from the outside?

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Stained Glass window above the alter. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Stained Glass window above the alter. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior - Ceiling detail of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior – Ceiling detail of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Ceiling rose detail. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Ceiling rose detail. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Detail of Benches - Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Detail of Benches – Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

The first public building in Chatham to be lit by electricity !

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view of benches on the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view of benches on the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A view from the upper balcony. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Timber screen fretwork. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Timber screen fretwork. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A seat in the choir . Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. A seat in the choir . Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

The Old Contemptibles

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Wonderful delicate lighting. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Wonderful delicate lighting. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

'Water from the Sea of Galilee' - Interior of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

‘Water from the Sea of Galilee’ – Interior of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Exterior pathway of St John's Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

Exterior pathway of St John’s Church, Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission Diocese of Rochester.

 

 

 

Newcomb’s War Diary –

On Tuesday 10th May I visited Penguins, 87-89 High Street Chatham. Penguins happens to be the Newcomb family business specialising in formal wear and wedding suits for men. I met Gerald Newcomb – a 7th generation Newcomb, running a business stretching back over 180 years in Chatham.

Gerald Newcomb, Penguins, 87 - 89 High Street, Chatham standing with the Newcomb War Diary. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

Gerald Newcomb, Penguins, 87 – 89 High Street, Chatham standing with the Newcomb War Diary. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

‘The family has served the great and the good for almost 180 years. Figures such as Charles Dickens, Lord Kitchener, Lord Byron and Lord Tennyson have enjoyed the service we offer – our workrooms were a hive of activity as we created shirts for King Edward VII!’ ‘Gerald is the 7th generation to run the firm and has himself been in the industry for 45 years.’

This business fits into our Chatham Placemaking Project primarily because of its association with our route  – Newcomb’s also had a Ladies Clothes Shop on Railway Street – but the big surprise is the Newcomb War Diary. Surely this has to be on our list of ‘10 things which made Chatham’.

The following statement comes from the Chatham Historical Society Website.

“A few years ago Chatham Historical Society was given permission to make a replica of an original diary written every day during the years of the Second World War by George West, company secretary of a navy tailors, hosiers, hatters and shirt makers in Chatham High Street called Newcomb’s. This replica of the “Newcomb War Diary”  is dedicated to the memory of Mr West, the Newcomb and Paine families, and all Medway people – both service personnel and civilians – who lived through the events described in it.

Newcomb’s opened for business in 1854. After the original shop was demolished when the Sir John Hawkins flyover was built, the business moved along the High Street to the corner of Medway Street. Mr Gerald Newcomb is still trading as Penguins Dress Hire.

The replica was paid for by Chatham Historical Society and a generous donation by the late Mr and Mrs W. Paine, and has been available to view at public events and libraries in the Medway towns.
It had been in Strood Library for many months, and their website states that it is on display there, but it might have moved on to another temporary home. Check with Strood Library for the latest situation.

The Paine family ran outfitter’s shops in Chatham and Strood, and were founders of the Chatham Reliance Building Society.”

 

This is the frontispiece of the Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

This is the frontispiece of the Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

The book referred by the Chatham Historical Society is a smaller copy version of this. The actual artefact – a fantastic large folio book / ledger was originally manufactured in Chatham for Newcomb’s – is unique and I felt privileged to be shown it.

This is the gold embossed front cover of the Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping - by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

This is the gold embossed front cover of the Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping – by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

A typical page layout of an untypical diary ! The Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping - by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

A typical page layout of an untypical diary ! The Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping – by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

A page from the Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping - by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

A page from the Newcomb War Diary belonging to Mr Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping – by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, 87 - 89 High Street, Chatham with the Newcomb War Diary. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Gerald Newcomb.

Gerald Newcomb of Penguins, 87 – 89 High Street, Chatham with the Newcomb War Diary. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Gerald Newcomb.