Tag Archives: Local History

‘Under the Shadow of the Crane’ ROCHESTER RIVERSIDE – PHASE 3 (2) CRANE POINT

Part 2. ‘Under the Shadow of the Crane’ is actually a reference to the whole of Rochester Riverside, as for much of its post 20th Century history, it was dominated and defined by tall cranes, loading and offloading from the various wharfs. However, a single 200tonne crane was retained & moved to this new position at Blue Boar Hard as a landmark and heritage beacon. Our journey for Phase 3 starts here.

Crane Point is the name for the public realm and viewing point under the shadow of the crane. The landscape has been designed by LUC as an Amphitheatre with precast concrete stepped seating and concrete paving extending around and beneath the crane. A large Apartment block is being built adjacent to the public space, which will look out over the crane and the River Medway.

This plan of the concept development masterplanning stage for the Phase 3 development at Blue Boar Wharf, Rochester Riverside shows opportunities for possible Public Art intervention within the site. Image: Christopher Tipping

Children swam from here…Blue Boar Wharf was our playground…

A forlorn Blue Boar Pier as it was in 1970, from a viewpoint looking out over the River towards the Chatham Dockyard. Image: By permission of MALSC
Artwork for the precast concrete Amphitheatre at Crane Point, Rochester Riverside Phase 3 Public Art Proposals. Image: Christopher Tipping

Crane Point – or Blue Boar Hard as it was called in its former life, is the end point of Blue Boar Lane, terminating with a Pier. It starts at its junction with Rochester High Street and the Blue Boar Public House (now demolished), leading under the railway tracks towards the river. At one time, the road split in two, with one track leading to the other side of Blue Boar Creek to James Hall & Son, Iron Foundry. Examples of their work can still be seen embedded into the pavements around Furrell’s Road. To the South of Blue Boar Creek, Blue Boar Wharf provided the river frontage for Barge Building. Up to 100 Medway Spritsail Barges were built here by William Higham. William lived on Victoria Street in Rochester and his wife had 9 children.

Plan of Crane Point draft artwork. Image: Christopher Tipping

William Higham was also notable as a signatory to a fascinating document signed by 251 individuals connected to the Coal Trade Port of Rochester trading from Rochester Riverside on February 10th 1876 petitioning the Mayor and Corporation of the City of Rochester to review the state of the roadway of Blue Boar Lane, which was in such a poor condition it was compelling commerce to land at Chatham and not Blue Boar Hard.

“ We the undersigned Ship Owners, Merchants, Captains and others connected with the coal trade of the Port of Rochester hereby beg to call your attention to the bad state of the roadway of Blue Boar Lane leading to the River Medway and considering the large amount of traffic now going to and from the River…the present state of the road being such as to compel many to land at Chatham who would otherwise do so at Blue Boar Hard…” MALSC

A document signed by 251 important people associated with Rochester Riverside petitioning for improvements to the condition of Blue Boar Lane to save their trade. By permission MALSC
Draft artwork for paving with Cast Iron detailing at Crane Point. Image: Christopher Tipping
Plan of draft artwork for paving to Crane Point with inset cast iron interpretation units. Image: Christopher Tipping
Plan of draft artwork for cast iron paving unit at Crane Point. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft artwork for cast iron paving units with text and pattern as interpretation. Image: Christopher Tipping
Crane Point PCC Amphitheatre – draft artwork for rebated text into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Crane Point PCC Amphitheatre – draft artwork for rebated text into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Crane Point PCC Amphitheatre – draft concept artwork showing rebated text cast into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping

Rather a lot of variations on a theme are drawn up – this is a process of discovery after all. I am often looking for something elusive. I don’t always know what I am chasing after or trying to uncover. Much of this work proves unsuitable to produce, or doesn’t fit the client brief (or budget) but nothing really ever goes to waste. Ideas unused are tucked away for another time.

The rebated letters within the cast concrete stepped units very from 5mm to 30mm deep. This allows for some expression and emphasis to be placed on certain anchor words, important for the interpretation on site. The large coloured letters are proposals for bespoke, highly detailed individual letters made of granite, enamelled steel or architectural glazed faience. These will be inset and bonded into several of the 30mm rebated capital letters, inspired by historiated initials of Illuminated Manuscripts in the Library of Rochester Cathedral.

Crane Point – PCC Amphitheatre – draft concept artwork exploring ideas for rebated text cast into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Crane Point – PCC Amphitheatre – draft concept artworks showing bespoke letters inset into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Crane Point – PCC Amphitheatre – draft concept artwork showing rebated text cast into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping

mmmm

Crane Point – PCC Amphitheatre – draft concept artwork showing rebated text cast into the concrete step riser. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Crane Point – Plan of PCC Amphitheatre – draft concept artwork showing the areas of rebated text cast into the concrete step risers. Artwork: Christopher Tipping. Plan Drawing: LUC

‘Under the shadow of the crane’ Rochester Riverside – Phase 3 (Post1)

In December 2019, I began research and concept development of Phase 3 Public Art proposals for Rochester Riverside. Commissioned by FrancisKnight Art Consultants for client Countryside Properties and The Hyde Group.

This plan of the concept development masterplanning stage for the Phase 3 development at Blue Boar Wharf, Rochester Riverside shows opportunities for possible Public Art intervention within the site. Image: Christopher Tipping
The 1898 OS Map overlaid with the new concept development proposals for Phase 3 on the Blue Boar Wharf Site. Image of 1898 Map by permission MALSC

I have had access to some amazing aerial images from Britain From Above. The following black and white images are so evocative and detailed, they tell a fascinating story of our site’s industrial and social history, nothing much of which survives today, except the large crane.

Rochester Riverside 1965 Aerial Image: By Permission – Britain From Above.
Limehouse Reach, River Medway, looking towards Chatham. Rochester Riverside 1965 Aerial Image: With Permission – Britain From Above.

The above image from 1965 shows the Gasworks, Limehouse Wharf, Acorn Wharf (Shipbuildng) Acorn House, RMC Aggregates and Ready Made Concrete, Cory’s Wharf (Coal), Chatham Goods Yard (Railways), Blue Boar Wharf, Furrell’s Wharf – almost all the way to Chatham Intra. So much to be inspired by…

I am collaborating with LUC and BPTW who are leading on the architecture, masterplanning and landscape design.

I am continuing to develop the work I created for Phases 1 & 2 as the site has endless riches to be inspired by. My problem is knowing where to stop the research. Each stone unturned has golden threads to follow. Contextually, we are now on the site of Blue Boar Wharf, in its heyday a major Barge Building site, with two Yards, Upper and Lower occupied by two businesses – William Higham, ran the Upper Yard, where he built 100 Barges between 1876 and 1901 & George Weedon the proprietor of the Lower Yard.

Cory’s Coal Wharf and Gyproc Products as seen looking towards Rochester Cathedral. Rochester Riverside 1936. Aerial Image: With Permission – Britain From Above.

Above: Gyproc Products (Plasterboard), started production on the Rochester Riverside site in 1933, just 3 years prior to this images from 1936 (the large white shed in the centre of the picture). Cory’s Wharf, with its ‘5 Cranes Dancing’, is in the foreground.

Cory’s Coal Wharf, Gyproc Products and the Cattle Market. Rochester Riverside 1936. Aerial Image: With Permission – Britain From Above.

Above: The coming of the railways in the 1840’s effectively separated the town from its salt marsh grazing pastures and community centred around The Common. The Cattle & Livestock Market – seen bottom left in this image from 1936 has rooftop graphics – advertising its products – probably for the benefit of train passengers, as the track was raised on an earthen bank and brick viaduct. ‘Thorley’s Food for Cattle’, & ‘Thorley’s Food for all Stock’.

Cory’s Coal Wharf and Gyproc Products as seen looking towards Rochester Cathedral. Rochester Riverside 1936. Aerial Image: With Permission – Britain From Above.

Above: This Postcard must be a very early image of the site, as there appears to be no industrial development of the Riverside site.

This Google Earth Image from 1960 shows the site in its Industrial heyday.
This Google Earth Image from 2017 shows the site stripped of its industry and prepared for development as a new residential community in Rochester.
One of two 200tonne Cranes was retained on site. This is not its original position, but nonetheless, it speaks loudly of the industrial heritage of the site. Image: Crane on Rochester Riverside cc-by-sa/2.0 – © Danny P Robinson – geograph.org.uk/p/843730

There is a great short film on You Tube called the Medway Dock Crane, which show the Blue Boar Wharf site and the whole of Rochester Riverside, prior to development by Countryside as seen from a drone. Click on the above link to view.

‘5 CRANES DANCING’ & OTHER STORIES FROM ROCHESTER RIVERSIDE – PHASES 1 & 2 (5)

By mid-December 2019, a number of the bespoke public art units (5 of 24) had been finally installed into the footpaths and thresholds of new properties along sections of Common Creek Wharf and Thalia Way. These parts of the site were fully occupied during the weeks leading up to Christmas. I will update as more units are installed –

Granite Unit ‘GOLDEN SAMPHIRE’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘GOLDEN SAMPHIRE’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘GOLDEN SAMPHIRE’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘SHELDUCK’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘SHELDUCK’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘SHELDUCK’ in progress at Hardscape England prior to being installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. This was a really complex unit to achieve. Image: Hardscape England
Granite Unit ‘SHELDUCK’ in progress at Hardscape England prior to being installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. This was a really complex unit to achieve. Image: Hardscape England
Granite Unit ‘WILLIAM CORY & SON LTD’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘WILLIAM CORY & SON LTD’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘WILLIAM CORY & SON LTD’ in progress at Hardscape England prior to being installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Hardscape England
Granite Unit ‘WILLIAM CORY & SON LTD’ being laser etched during production at Hardscape England prior to being installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Hardscape England
Cast Iron Unit ‘5 CRANES DANCING’ installed at Rochester Riverside. Manufactured to my designs by Hargreaves Foundry. Image: Christopher Tipping
Cast Iron Unit ‘5 CRANES DANCING’ installed at Rochester Riverside. Manufactured to my designs by Hargreaves Foundry. Image: Christopher Tipping
Cast Iron Unit ‘5 CRANES DANCING’ installed at Rochester Riverside. Manufactured to my designs by Hargreaves Foundry. Image: Christopher Tipping
Above: Concept Development Masterplan circa 2017, Rochester Riverside by BPTW. Below: Rochester Riverside 1936, Photograph by permission of Britain From Above.

Above: You may just be able to make out the ‘5 Cranes Dancing’...just below the CORY’S WHARF text . These cranes were eventually replaced by 2 x 200 tonne Cranes, each capable of lifting 10 tons at a time.

Granite Unit ‘WALRUS & NELLIE’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping

Granite Unit ‘WALRUS & NELLIE’ installed at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘WALRUS & NELLIE’ in prodution at Hardscape England prior to installation at Rochester Riverside. A variety of granites with water jet cut, inlaid, laser etched and sandblasted detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘ADA & EDITH’ installed at Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘ADA & EDITH’ installed at Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping
Granite Unit ‘ADA & EDITH’ during manufacture at Hardscape England and now installed at Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘VOID’, LONDON ROAD 2008

‘During the nights of 30 November and 1 December 1940, the Southampton Blitz reached its climax as the city came under sustained attack. Hundreds of tonnes of bombs were dropped during the two nights, whilst on 30th November alone some 634 individual properties were left ablaze –’. Ordnance Survey

Sustained & heavy bombing between 23rd – 30th November 1940, left Southampton City Centre devastated. The destruction at the very heart of the built fabric of the city left seven Churches destroyed, including Holy Rood, All Saints, St James’, St Mary’s, St Luke’s & St Paul’s.

Sexfoil Terrazzo seat on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman

Above: ‘Void’. A bespoke black terrazzo platform seat, one of two sexfoil shaped seats commissioned for the London Road scheme, completed in 2008. The public art and interpretation for the public realm and highways improvement project was inspired by the Parish of St Paul’s Church, London Road, a vibrant community and shopping street, which was effectively destroyed on November 30th 1940 during the Southampton Blitz, when the Church was bombed and devastated by fire. London Road was badly damaged and the Church never rebuilt. An evocative image from the time shows the Church interior with the shape of the destroyed Rose Window appearing as a black void. This project evolved around this one powerful image. It evokes a legacy of community, architecture and people, which is explored in the public art seating other found on site today.

St Paul’s Church, London Road, Southampton. Image: Southampton Local Studies and Maritime Library & Southampton Archives
The manufacture of the bespoke terrazzo benches was carried out by Quality Marble (Pallam Precast) at their works in Enfield, London.
‘VOID’, sexfoil geometry drawing. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
‘VOID’, sexfoil bench geometry drawing. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
‘VOID’, sexfoil bench sketch drawing for stainless steel leg supports. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
‘VOID’, sexfoil bench sketch drawing for test sample. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
‘VOID’, sexfoil geometry drawing. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
‘VOID’, sexfoil geometry drawing. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sketch line drawings for paving and seating plans. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sketch line drawings for paving and seating plans. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sketch line drawings for paving and seating plans. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sketch line drawings & models for paving and seating plans. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sketch line drawings & models for paving and seating plans. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sketch line drawings & models for paving and seating plans. London Road, Southampton. Image: Christopher Tipping
St Paul’s Church, London Road, Southampton. Image: Southampton Local Studies and Maritime Library & Southampton Archives
St Paul’s Church, London Road, Southampton. Image: Southampton Local Studies and Maritime Library & Southampton Archives
Sexfoil & Lozenge shaped Terrazzo seats installed on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman

This project was commissioned by Elizabeth Smith, Public Art Officer for Southampton City Council in 2005, to work in collaboration with the project team to research, develop and create concept designs and proposals for environmental public artworks integral to the London Road scheme.  I was asked to establish an overall concept for the area with particular consideration of pedestrian use and movement across roads and through spaces & placemaking and urban form, hard and soft landscaping, paving details and surfacing treatments, thresholds, markers or ‘gateways’, seating and / or sculpture. My contribution was contextually driven and collaborative.

Sexfoil & Lozenge shaped Terrazzo seats installed on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman

2 No. 3000mm diameter x 140mm thick pre-cast dark grey/black terrazzo platform seats manufactured in one piece to a Sexfoil pattern, inclusive of a 160mm built up external edge with 100mm radius semi bullnose detail and 10mm pencil round rebate. Grade C40 concrete is to be used. All terrazzo mixes and samples were approved prior to manufacture by Southampton City Council engineers and the project artist (me). The seats are reinforced throughout to A393 with 10mm welded bar mesh. Bottom mesh to full cover. Top mesh localised cover only to ‘hot spots’. All grit polished to a fine 120 honed finish, chemically sealed with anti-graffiti finishes approved by SCC.

5 No. 3000m x 700mm x 140 lozenge shaped benches were also manufactured, each with inset text. Both bench types have stainless steel leg supports, 316 SS spec.

The benches were positioned at relevant site along London Road, which related to past events and distant voices as well as lost buildings.

Text from an old St Paul’s Parish Magazine reflected the local community. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Southampton Local Studies & Maritime Library.
Text from an old St Paul’s Parish Magazine reflected the local community. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Southampton Local Studies & Maritime Library.

Above: Ordinary lives and everyday events were recorded in a series of surviving Parish Magazines form St Paul’s Church. These distant voices of a local community and Parish still seem fresh and lively.

Text from an old St Paul’s Parish Magazine reflected the local community. Image: Christopher Tipping by permission of Southampton Local Studies & Maritime Library.
The Manufacture of the bespoke terrazzo benches was carried out by Quality Marble (Pallam Precast) at their works in Enfield, London.
The manufacture of the bespoke terrazzo benches was carried out by Quality Marble (Pallam Precast) at their works in Enfield, London. The moulds were all made by hand and cast by hand too. Image: Christopher Tipping
The manufacture of the bespoke terrazzo benches was carried out by Quality Marble (Pallam Precast) at their works in Enfield, London. The moulds were all made by hand and cast by hand too. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sexfoil & Lozenge shaped Terrazzo seats installed on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman
Sexfoil & Lozenge shaped Terrazzo seats installed on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman
Lozenge Terrazzo seat on London Road, Southampton 2008. “the spirit of the townspeople is unbroken – December 1940′. Image: Christopher Tipping

Lozenge Terrazzo seat on London Road, Southampton 2008. “Mile End, 6 hours, Saturday 30th November 1940′. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘Naked Street takes National award. Southampton’s new ‘naked street’ in London Road has picked up a national award for the Best Urban Transport Design from the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, regarded as one of the top industry awards 2010.

This is a significant boost for the naked street concept, the principles of which promote a balance of traffic movement and social uses of public spaces. London Road in Southampton was stripped of road signs, given ‘informal’ road signs, and widened footpaths. The scheme has already had a positive impact by decreases in serious injury accidents and a reduction in vehicle speeds. Living Streets believe that schemes which use naked streets principles have great potential to make our streets safer and more people-friendly, by changing the behaviour of all road users for the better. London Road in Southampton is a good example of a scheme that has improved safety and ensured accessibility.

This scheme has also been chosen by the Department of Transport (Dft) as an example of best practice and will be included in the Dft’s national design document ‘Manual for Streets 2.’

Highly Commended: London Road, Southampton

Solent Quality Places Design Awards 2010

Sponsored by PUSH, the Solent Design Awards are all about the encouragement of Quality place-making: schemes that create special places, lift communities, create richer experiences …not just iconic buildings but also the places in-between, the carrier spaces for our daily lives.

Street scene on a regenerated London Road following the project completion in March 2008. Image: Christopher Tipping
Street scene on a regenerated London Road following the project completion in March 2008. Image: Christopher Tipping
Street scene on a regenerated London Road following the project completion in March 2008. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sexfoil Terrazzo seat on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Christopher Tipping
Street scene on a regenerated London Road following the project completion in March 2008. Image: Christopher Tipping
St Paul’s Church, London Road, Southampton 1890. Image: Southampton Local Studies and Maritime Library & Southampton Archives
St Paul’s Church, London Road, Southampton. Image: Southampton Local Studies and Maritime Library & Southampton Archives
St Paul’s Church, London Road, Southampton. Image: Southampton Local Studies and Maritime Library & Southampton Archives
Sexfoil & Lozenge shaped Terrazzo seats installed on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman
Sexfoil & Lozenge shaped Terrazzo seats installed on London Road, Southampton 2008. Image: Graham Redman

WINCHESTER STATION APPROACH – PART 10 – FINAL COMMENTS

This short creative contract to research and develop concept-led proposals for design interpretation and public art for Winchester Station Approaches has now completed.

Winchester Station and approaches 2019. Image: Christopher Tipping

This work was intended to inform discussion, dialogue and consultation with regard to the final form and feel for the public realm around Winchester Station. This form of placemaking based upon creative site analysis and creative research , which hopefully results in an original interpretation for the site, is essential to create a space fully responsive to its local environment and client & user aspirations.

Draft concept study for an interpretive public art & public realm to Winchester Station & Station Approaches. Image: Christopher Tipping Artwork superimposed onto LDS plan.
Draft concept study for an interpretive public art & public realm to Winchester Station & Station Approaches. Image: Christopher Tipping
Study with Key to concept & research led creative proposals for interpretation and public art with which to influence the design process for public realm at Winchester Station. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: This draft study detail of the key to materials, finishes and 3D objects, is a concept only proposal and not intended as a final design. Its description of materials, forms and finishes is subject to further discussion and comment. with a future project team.

Draft concept study for an interpretive public art & public realm to Winchester Station & Station Approaches. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft concept study for an interpretive public art & public realm to Winchester Station & Station Approaches. Image: Christopher Tipping
Concept & creative interpretation studies for form and shape of seating, public art & interpretation for Winchester Station & Approaches. Image & Artwork by Christopher Tipping

WINCHESTER STATION APPROACH – PART 9 – STONES AS YET UNTURNED & OTHER STREAMS OF INFLUENCE!

On 24th July I came to Winchester to meet Annabelle Boyes (Receiver General) and Catherine Hodgson (Marketing Manager) at Winchester Cathedral.

High Altar of Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping

I had requested a meeting as a matter of courtesy, having visited the Cathedral several times previously during my research work for the Winchester Station Approach Project. It was important I met with Annabelle as I wished to discuss the possibility of collaborating with the Cathedral and particularly with the Stonemasons. Not only that, but I wished to know more about the Cathedral’s role in the community – an enormously broad subject, but nonetheless, one that I considered vital to understand the nature of its calling. It was of real interest to me to hear Annabelle talk about the Cathedral as a living place serving not only its faithful and local congregation, but everyone and anyone. A living and breathing building, actively engaging with and remaining vital to a worldwide audience in the 21st Century.

Winchester Cathedral Calling and Vision Publication. Image: Winchester Cathedral.

One outstanding calling is about welcome. In the Cathedra’s Calling and Vision document , emphasis is placed on welcome, access to all, hospitality and pilgrimage. The Cathedral Close is a haven for visitors and locals alike. The Station is also a Gateway to Winchester, so the same ethos ought to be present here in the public realm too, with an emphasis on welcome, and civic hospitality. A place of arrival and departure, a place of safety, a gateway and a welcome.

Marketing Manager Catherine Hodgson, then took me on a walk around the Cathedral and its outbuildings, including a visit to the stonemasons yard. Should the project progress to design stage, then I will certainly be advocating for a cross discipline collaboration with the Cathedral.

Carved stone head support from a 17th Century Memorial. Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping
A page taken from ‘ILLUMINATION’, showing an images of the 7th Century Anglo Saxon Alter Base. Development update from Winchester Cathedral ISSUE 17 – April 2019. Image: Winchester Cathedral
The Forecourt of the British Library by Colin St John Wilson 1998. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: The forecourt (piazza) of The British Library, St Pancras. Colin St John Wilson, 1998. The block seating at the crossing of the pavement grid, resemble the Cathedral’s stone carved or wooden bosses, which appear at the junctions of the stone ribs in the vaulted nave.

Timber carved roof bosses at the junctions of vaulted ribs in Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping
Sarsen Stone W17 N in Winchester on the corner of Minster Lane and St Thomas Street. Image: City of Winchester Website
Sarsen Stone W17 D, St John’s Church, St John’s Street, Winchester. Image: City of Winchester Website
Sarsen Stones in Winchester. Image: City of Winchester Website

Sarsen Stones in Winchester’, from the website of The City of Winchester – these sandstone blocks, sought after as ‘markers’, are an inspiration for block seating at Station Approach…see below…

Studies for stone aggregate Roof Boss Benches with laminated stone or terrazzo additions. Image: Christopher Tipping

A number of industries, which Winchester supported, including Watermills, Brewing and Iron Foundries depended upon an immediate and plentiful supply of water. Winchester’s waterways brought wealth to the Cathedral.

Amongst these industries, several stand out as examplers –

Winchester City Mill – one thousand years of history milling corn and the use of Millstones of Basaltic Stone.

Anatomy of a Millstone – General Reference. Image and Source: Wikipedia

Durngate Mill – demolished in 1966 after 700 years on the site.

City Engineering Works and Iron Foundry – Jewell Family of Middle and Lower Brook Street. Amongst other things the made components for the GWR Railways Winchester to Newbury Line. The family were also involved with Durngate Mill and the initials of Philip Charles Jewell appear on much cast iron work in the City.

Iron Founders and Engineers Dean & Smith

Walker & Co, Danemark Works –

Union Workhouse , Oram’s Arbour, Winchester –

Hyde Brewery , Hyde Street, Winchester –

The Waterways of Winchester-part2 – City of Winchester Trust News Spring 1995. Elizabeth Proudman’s first article was published in the Spring 1994 Newsletter. She continues her story. Image: City of Winchester Trust

Above: This section of text by Elizabeth Proudman begins the report into The Waterways of Winchester.

Drawing of the River Itchen as it courses through Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping
Concept study of the River Itchen as it courses through Winchester against a backdrop of flint. Image: Christopher Tipping
Studies for stone aggregate (terrazzo) benches with inset River Itchen detail. Image: Christopher Tipping
Study for stone aggregate (terrazzo) bench with inset River Itchen detail & laminated contrasting stone end section. Image: Christopher Tipping
Concept study for architectural toughened glass & laminated bench with sandblasted and infilled River Itchen. Image: Christopher Tipping
Study for architectural toughened glass laminated bench with sandblasted and filled River Itchen detail & contrasting aggregate flint end section. Image: Christopher Tipping
Study for architectural toughened glass laminated bench – showing layers exploded – with sandblasted and filled River Itchen detail & contrasting aggregate flint end section. Image: Christopher Tipping
Studies for stone aggregate Bridge Benches with cantilever flint terrazzo addition. Image: Christopher Tipping
Studies for stone aggregate Bridge Benches with cantilever flint terrazzo or timber addition. Image: Christopher Tipping
Studies for stone aggregate column posts or perches with decorative motifs. Image: Christopher Tipping

ROCHESTER RIVERSIDE – PUBLIC ART IN PRODUCTION – ARTSCAPEOLOGY AT HARDSCAPE ENGLAND – PART 4

My recent trip up to Hardscape at Logistics North near Bolton was a ‘more than hoped for’ brilliant success. This work was conceived with care, skill and emotion. I feel I can honestly say it has been manufactured with care, with enormous skill and equal amounts of emotion. This is what I want to be doing with my time! Achieving beautiful things, creating good work, working with great people. Focussing on craft and natural materials, on age-old skills of hand and eye, fused with technological innovation. I want to work alongside and collaborate with people who are proud of what they do and shout it from the rooftops. –

OK – so with that out of the way, let’s take a look at some of the day’s outstanding work.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: My good friend, the ampersand. ‘WALRUS & NELLIE’. Unit size – 900mm x 300mm x 75mm. More ‘Tales from Rochester Riverside’…

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Details of ‘ADA & EDITH‘ , 900mm x 300mm x 75mm with an inverted ‘WALRUS & NELLIE’. at top. Unit size – 900mm x 300mm x 75mm.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Details of ‘ADA & EDITH‘ , 900mm x 300mm x 75mm with a rectangular block of Carlow Limestone crisply laser etched with the name ‘ADA’ & inset into a slab of Porphyry. An inverted ‘WALRUS & NELLIE’ at top, was also sandblasted and inset with text – unit size – 900mm x 300mm x 75mm.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Eleven of the fifteen units being created up at Hardscape are visible in this image.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: At bottom, ‘DUNLIN A SALTMARSH BIRD’, with water jet cut, inset, laser etched and sandblasted granite – unit size – 1200mm x 400mm x 75mm . At top, an inverted ‘GOOZERS & WATERMEN’ – unit size – 900mm x 300mm x 75mm.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

The beautifully detailed DUNLIN in black Carlow Limestone is laser etched, then water jet cut from its slab and inset into the red Shiraz base slab. The letter ‘D’ is also water jet cut from green Kobra Granite and inset into both the red Shiraz and the Black Carlow, bonded in place with a golden yellow resin specially selected for colour. The letter ‘U’ and other visible text is sandblasted. This is highly skilled and complex work. Looks bloody amazing too…

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: ‘GOOZERS & WATERMEN’ is no less complex, with water jet cut and inset text in Maple Red Granite, inlaid into a Black Carlow Limestone base slab, which is in turn sandblasted with text and laser etched to two depths to create the rippling water effect. See images below.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: The laser etched text ‘Watermen’ on the ‘GOOZERS & Watermen’, panel is wonderfully delivered with a deeper etch to the centre and a delicate lighter etch to the outline. This attention to detail and finish it what makes these bespoke units so outstanding.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Detail of ‘SHELDUCK’, Laser etched bird motif on black Carlow Limestone, water jet cut-out and inset into a Kobra Green base slab. Letter ‘D’ is also water jet cut and inset. The other letters are sandblasted into the Kobra Green. Unit size – 960mm x 400mm x 75mm

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Details of ‘SHELDUCK’ & ‘PERENNIAL GLASSWORT’, just two of our 15 tales from Rochester Riverside. ‘SHELDUCK’, is a laser etched bird motif on black Carlow Limestone, water jet cut-out and inset into a Kobra Green base slab with large letter ‘D’ also water jet cut and inset. The other letters are sandblasted into the Kobra Green. Unit size – 960mm x 400mm x 75mm. ‘PERENNIAL GLASSWORT’ is a red Shiraz slab base sandblasted to two depths for text and plant motifs. Royal White & Carlow Limestone letters have also been inset into the surface.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Detail of some of the letters of ‘PERENNIAL GLASSWORT’ sandblasted into red Shiraz granite.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: ‘MARSH COWS GRAZING’..& other tales from Rochester Riverside’ is Unit No. 8 in a sequence of 15 bespoke granite units along with 9 bespoke cast iron units together create a story about the history and use of this site from Medieval times to the present day. The slabs are robust and heavyweight, adding a physical presence to the narratives they embody. The lives and livelihoods of Rochester people are represented here. These histories live on in stone and cast iron.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Detail of letters ‘C’ & ‘O’, bot water jet cut and inset from Maple Red Granite and Porphyry respectively and inset into sandblasted Kobra green Granite.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above & Below: ‘BLUE BOAR CREEK’ & ‘GOLDEN SAMPHIRE’, 2 more Tales from Rochester Riverside. Large letter ‘B’ water jet cut from Maple Red Granite, inset into Black Carlow Limestone with laser etched detail.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: ‘GOLDEN SAMPHIRE’ still has the resin bond material smeared over the surface…the cleaned up version can be seen below.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: The large letter ‘S’ is water jet cut from black Carlow Limestone, which has beautiful white shell deposits within its matrix., which are wonderfully contrasting when wet.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above & Below: ’15 BARGES STARTED THE RACE’ & ‘RUSSET BROWN & OCHRE SAILS’. Both bespoke units exhibit great colour contrast and use of stone. Deliberate use of coloured resin bond to fix water jet cut motifs in place adds another dimension.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Detail of the red Shiraz base slab with sandblasted text into which is inset a 2 colour motif with Maple Red granite and Kobra Green, fixed with a coloured resin bond.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above and Below: ‘THE FIVE BROTHERS’ & ‘SPRITSAIL BARGE’, share a base slab of Porphyry, with sandblasted text and motifs. FIVE BROTHERS has the word ‘FIVE’ inset in water jet cut Maple Red, whilst SPRITSAIL has three letters ‘S’ ‘g’ & ‘L’ inset in Royal White for contrast.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above and images below: ‘COAL – METER HEAVER WHIPPER’ & ‘WILLIAM CORY & SON LTD COAL FACTORS’. 2 Tales from Rochester Riverside…

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Top slab1200mm x 400mm x 75mm – Crystal Black base slab with sandblasted text & water jet cut and inset Maple Red rectangle with additional inset text in Crystal Black. Bottom slab960mm x 400mm x 75mm – Black Carlow Limestone base slab with sandblasted text and motifs with water jet cut and inset Maple Red granite letters and motifs.

Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Hardscape
Detail: Bespoke public art units for Countryside Homes at Rochester Riverside in production at Hardscape England. Image: Hardscape

WINCHESTER STATION APPROACH – PART 8 – A CHANGE OF DIRECTION

At the beginning of August 2019 I was issued with a much simplified plan of the public realm proposals by LDS Architects.

August 2019 Public Realm Plan for Winchester Station Approaches. Image: LDS Architects (cropped & annotated).

Above: This image – a cropped version of the plan drawing issued by LDA, shows the principal public realm and station access roads. The previous concept proposal for the public art benches and interpretation following the radial plan as previously illustrated was no longer viable, but the strong horizontal banding across the station forecourt still provided a viable grid and scaffold upon which to set out my ideas.

I have always been in favour of using sandstone as the principle paving material, as this has history with the city, plus in terms of colour and appearance, seems much more sympathetic to the fabric of the site and its low level & undemonstrative railway architecture, rather than big city, corporate use of granite for public realm.

Sandstone Paving – Public Realm, Francis Crick Institute, London. Image: Christopher Tipping
Winchester Station Approach project. Paving patterns and materials used in Winchester. Images: Christopher Tipping & Dave Lowe
Stone paving and ceramic tiles from the interior of Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping

We could explore the use of varied sizes of paving slab, within a manageable modular framework. The stone paving in the Cathedral for example, exhibits a wide range of slab size, from a small unit square Purbeck Stone tile – which appears to have been the principle paving material – to the larger and unique Ledger (memorial) Stones in Tournai Marble & other stones.

Concept study proposal for paving and seating within the public realm & approaches of Winchester Station. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Detailed & annotated concept study proposal for paving and seating within the public realm & approaches of Winchester Station. Artwork: Christopher Tipping

Above: Both images explore the possibilities of embedding interpretive Public Art elements within the revised LDS Public Realm proposal – seating, paving and retaining structures bringing an original and creative interpretation to the site. Working within the proposed LDS scheme, seating could be positioned at intervals along the parallel banding, using these lines as the principal interpretive parameters.

Concept study for a cast Iron paving panel with low relief text. Winchester Station Approaches. Image: Christopher Tipping

The key in the plan above outlines the use of:

Sandstone for main paving of the forecourt –

Cast Iron elements with low relief text and / or motifs set within the parallel banding in the paving & an extra wide kerb detail . There were several Iron Foundries in Winchester, which served the Railways –

Porphyry Paving for the primary parallel banding –

Bespoke Benches or ‘Perches’ –

Possible sandblasted, inlaid or etched surface patterns to the sandstone paving – employing super-graphic motifs inspired by the medieval ceramic tiling within the Cathedral –

Granite, Cast Iron, Cast Concrete or Steel defensive barrier structures which can double as seating or ‘perches’, following the radius curve of the highway. These are modelled on cross sections through stone piers in the Cathedral. –

Draft artworks playing with text, texture and the richness of architectural decoration & materials in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping
Black & white motif based upon a medieval ceramic inlaid tile at Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Concept study proposal for paving and seating within the public realm & approaches of Winchester Station. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Concept study proposal for paving and seating within the public realm & approaches of Winchester Station. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Detail: Plan drawings of Winchester Cathedral taken from ‘The Grid System & Design of the Norman Cathedral’ by Eric Fernie.
Pier Sections: Winchester Cathedral. Detail: Section drawings of Transept & Nave Piers of Winchester Cathedral taken from ‘The Grid System & Design of the Norman Cathedral’ by Eric Fernie.
Pier Section study. Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping
Pier Section studies Winchester Cathedral. Winchester Station Approaches Project. Image: Christopher Tipping
Concept & site interpretation studies for seating, barrier structures and public art, based upon pier sections from Winchester Cathedral for Winchester Station Approaches public realm. Image & Artwork by Christopher Tipping
Detail: Concept study proposal for paving and seating within the public realm & approaches of Winchester Station. Artwork: Christopher Tipping
Black & white motif based upon a medieval ceramic inlaid tile at Winchester Cathedral. Used as large scale decoration on a proposal for a monolithic stone bench. Image: Christopher Tipping
A decorative motif based upon a medieval ceramic inlaid tile at Winchester Cathedral. Used as large scale decoration, either inset or sandblasted, on a proposal for a monolithic stone bench. Image: Christopher Tipping

ROCHESTER RIVERSIDE – PUBLIC ART IN PRODUCTION – HARDSCAPE ENGLAND – PART 3

I’m travelling up north to Bolton this week to see the final units completed and hopefully sign off the work so it can be delivered to Rochester Riverside for installation. Can’t wait to see them all.

Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam

Above: “BLUE BOAR CREEK”…& other tales from Rochester Riverside. Detail of a water-jet cut & laser-etched paving panel in black Carlow Limestone with inset text of Amarelo Real (yellow granite) & Porphyry.

These new images are just in this afternoon thanks to Mathew Haslam of Hardscape – as their skilled stone specialists focus on the applied detail. Water jet cutting, inlaying, sandblasting and laser etching their way through 15 bespoke units destined to be embedded into the landscape of the new housing development at Rochester Riverside for client Countryside. This highly bespoke work needs to be handled with care and demands high levels of craft skills.

Hardscape have been excellent at providing this form creative collaboration. Public Art Strategy & Artists Commissions by FrancisKnight .

Below: This unit is 9 of 15 – ‘SHELDUCK’, a Kobra Green Granite base slab with water jet cut inset motif & text in black Carlow Limestone, which has been laser etched with surface detail. Further sandblasting of text into the green granite, will complete the work.

Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam
Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam
Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam

Above: The almost completed ‘WILLIAM CORY & SON LTD’.

Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam

Above: This is the base slab of black Carlow Limestone, which has been laser etched first & then water jet cut – but the large letter ‘W’, the ‘&’ and the diamond motif have yet to be chiselled out. See Below –

Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam

Above: The water jet cutting removes a series of lines from the granite, which are determined by the CAD programme, which creates the cutting paths. These pathways are interesting in themselves as patterns, but in this instance they have to be chiselled out carefully by hand, to create the void space for the granite inlay to be fixed.

Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam

Above: This images shows the void spaces chiselled out from the Carlow Limestone. The letter ‘W’ in Maple Red granite has already been inset and is awaiting bonding in place – the diamond motif is just about to be inset. These images are wonderful for showing process, craft and the mix of skills from CAD technology to work by hand & eye.

Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam
Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam
Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam
Hardscape’s stone specialists continuing their great work on my bespoke granite public art granite features for Rochester Riverside. Image: Hardscape Mathew Haslam

WINCHESTER STATION APPROACH – PART 7 – WELCOME TO WINCHESTER

In June 2019 I was issued with early draft plans for the public realm proposals at the Station by LDS Architects on behalf of Winchester City Council. I proposed to add a layer of creative interpretation to these plans, based on my contextual research and employ the setting out details within the LDS plan as a secure foundation into which I could set my public art concept drafts. My proposal was always going to be about utilising the need for paving, seating, retaining walls and other practical details of public realm highways engineering to keep visual clutter at a minimum. This would also be more economic in terms of budget use and future management and maintenance.

Concept & interpretation draft studies for seating and public art for Winchester Station Approaches. Base detail plan drawing by LDS Architects. Image & Colour Artwork by Christopher Tipping

Above: The Station building is on the left of this plan drawing (as seen from above). The plan for the public realm is primarily a sequence of parallel horizontal bands (green) delineated in the paving, which flow downhill from the Station towards City Road and another series which flow uphill along Station Road. However, this baseline geometry is combined with a radial pattern (also in green) which expresses the radius curve in the highway as it transitions from Station Road to Station Hill. This radial pattern provides the anchor for a series of seats (red) and secondary barrier structures (blue). These are concept ideas only – and not designs.

Concept & interpretation studies for seating and public art for Winchester Station Approaches. Base plan drawing by LDS Architects. Image & Artwork by Christopher Tipping

Above: This concept study shows a series of interrelated structures – which could be seating, walls, barrier structures or paving – set out in a radial pattern. These forms are presented as interpretive devices which exhibit combinations of materials and motifs, which seen together in this way embody ideas and responses developed from the contextual research I have undertaken.

Draft form for seating or paving. Terrazzo with exposed polished flint. Image: Christopher Tipping
The building materials of Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft forms for seating or paving. Terrazzo with exposed polished flint. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft forms for seating or paving. Monolithic Stone with laminate stone extensions & inset text or applied pattern. Image: Christopher Tipping
Detail of Illuminated Initial in Gold. Winchester Bible Illumination. Copyright Winchester Cathedral. Image: John Crook

Above: The Winchester Bible is regarded as the largest & finest 12th century Illuminated Manuscript. The script is by the hand of a single monk scribe from Winchester. However, the magnificent illuminations were often drawn and painted by itinerant artists – lay professionals who travelled between monasteries and centres of learning. These Illuminated Initials have been inspirational, as has the Morley Library, of which the Winchester Bible is a part. Bishop George Morley bequeathed his collection of rare books to the Cathedral in the 17th Century. His collection is also monogrammed.

Draft artwork playing with text & the texture and pattern of knapped flint. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft artwork playing with text as illuminated initials & the texture and pattern of knapped flint. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft artworks playing with text as illuminated initials & the texture and pattern of Winchester building materials. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Polished flint terrazzo circle with inset letter ‘W’ in Swedish Marble with sandblasted detail, resin bonded in white.

Draft artworks playing with text, texture and the richness of architectural decoration in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Plan study (meaning ‘seen from above’)of a monolithic sandstone bench with a flat seating surface with the inset letter W and Circle motifs in flint aggregate terrazzo. Below: Sandstone & Flint are primary building materials in Winchester.

Sandstone is a primary building stone of Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping
There is one sample of Swedish Marble in Winchester Cathedral. A Ledger Stone for the daughter of Sir John Clobery. Image: Christopher Tipping

“Of particular interest is the ledger stone (memorial) of Francisca Clobery, the daughter of Sir John Clobery. She died in 1683 and her grave is in the south aisle of the Retrochoir, in front of her father’s monument. It is of a distinctive Ordovician limestone (around 465 million years ago) from the Island of Öland, Sweden, containing the straight-shelled Nautiloid.” from ‘Winchester Stone’ by Dr John Parker 2016. ‘John Parker studied geology at Birmingham and Cambridge universities. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society of London. For over 30 years he worked as an exploration geologist for Shell around the world. He has lived in Winchester since 1987. On retirement he trained to be a Cathedral guide’. John has personally shown me around the Cathedral and pointed out many geologic wonders and quirks.

190507 BENCH laminated 1 Winchester Station Approaches. Christopher Tipping
Draft artworks playing with text, texture and the richness of architectural decoration & materials in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Studies for objects (seating?) in Timber, Sandstone and Swedish Marble employing techniques of inlay, lamination, polishing and sandblasting.

Draft artworks playing with text, texture and the richness of architectural decoration & materials found in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping

Above: Study for two concept benches in monolithic black Tournai Marble with inlaid detail and laminated stone additions of Swedish Marble.

Ledger stone of black Tournai Marble with carving in Winchester Cathedral. Winchester Station Approaches. Christopher Tipping
Detail: Carved figures from the 12th Century Tournai Marble Font. The building materials & memorials of Winchester Cathedral. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft artworks playing with text, texture and referencing the richness of architectural decoration & materials in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping
Draft artworks playing with text, texture and referencing the richness of architectural decoration & materials in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping

I hope to investigate manufacturing processes which allow stone to be cut, laminated, decorated and finished in a manner which embodies the richness of the Cathedral interiors and it’s ongoing repair and regeneration – BUT – in a functional manner, either as seating etc or as a method of improving wayfinding for visitors.

Draft artworks playing with text, texture and referencing the richness of architectural decoration & materials in Winchester. Image: Christopher Tipping
Concept & creative interpretation studies for seating and public art for Winchester Station Approaches. Image & Artwork by Christopher Tipping
Concept & creative interpretation studies for seating and public art for Winchester Station Approaches. Image & Artwork by Christopher Tipping