Tag Archives: Urban Landscape

THESE ARE OUR STREETS Part Two

THESE ARE OUR STREETS  Part Two…CHATHAM UP ! We have always planned to create a magazine or booklet…some form of printed publication or other, with which to celebrate and record our progress, our ideas, the stuff that got away…but mostly our collaboration with each other and with the people along our route. We may still be able to deliver this a a hard-copy paper publication at some point in the future, as a way or marking the project – or as an online event.

The following images will show you part of our journey to create the draft and concepts for the work you can now see embedded into the pavements of Railway Street and Military Square. The content has been generated in collaboration with other artists and creatives, commissioned to deliver specific aspects of our work, but who directly and indirectly contributed so brilliantly to the outcome. FrancisKnight Public Art Consultants, Rob Young – Writer, Xtina Lamb – Printmaker, Simon Williams – Filmmaker & Paul Baker – Graphic Designer.

Draft Magazine – Optional Cover: CHATHAM UP. Image: Christopher Tipping

The yellow cover was the first logo and layout we created…the inspiration for this as well as the overall style and approach to the magazine concept came from looking at archive print magazines and periodicals at the Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre in Strood. We were drawn to copies of CHATS magazine – the Chatham Port Division Magazine from 1955.

The A5 size and very distinctive 1950’s advertising inside were just what we were looking for.

CHATS Magazine – The Chatham Port Division Magazine. Volume 8, April 1955 Volume . By Kind Permission of MALSC

 

It can’t really be a surprise that such a massive military and naval presence in Chatham was serviced by local outfitters. What is interesting is that so many of these had businesses on Military Road and Railway Street. At the Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre, there is a collection of print magazines and periodicals. An amazing selection of adverts for military and civilian outfitters are contained within – almost all of them along our route of Railway Street and Military Road. I managed to find a copy to buy – Vol.8 April 1955 No. 2 

Amongst some that I listed were –

 

“Over a century of experience in expert tailoring of both naval and civilian outfits”. 

 

 

W.Cooper – ‘Cooperstyle’ Regimental Blazers! 56 Military Road  –

Gieves Ltd – 13 Military Road –

Unifit – 40 Military Road –

Baker & Co – 22 Railway Street – “As long as the Spirit of England Remains, we are at your service”. 

A. Fleming & Co. Outfitters Ltd Contractors to the Admiralty – 15 Railway Street –

F & H Newcombe – Military, Naval and General Outfitters – Railway Street –

C.H Bernard & Sons – Bernard Buildings, Military Road

Military Outfitters, Baker & Co. 22 Railway Street, Chatham. CHATS Magazine. Collection of Christopher Tipping

Military Outfitters, Baker & Co. 22 Railway Street, Chatham. CHATS Magazine. Collection of Christopher Tipping

Coopers Windows are the Talk of the Town. CHATS Magazine Vol 8 April 1955 No 2. Collection fo Christopher Tipping

Coopers Windows are the Talk of the Town. CHATS Magazine Vol 8 April 1955 No 2. Collection of Christopher Tipping

C.H Bernard & Sons Naval & Civilian Tailors and Outfitters. CHATS Magazine. Collection of Christopher Tipping

C.H Bernard & Sons Naval & Civilian Tailors and Outfitters. CHATS Magazine. Collection of Christopher Tipping

 

The other clear inspiration for me was the archive of Newcomb’s the tailors. They opened for business in 1854. After the original shop was demolished when the Sir John Hawkins flyover was built, the business moved along the High Street to the corner of Medway Street. Mr Gerald Newcomb is still trading as Penguins Dress HireGerald is the 7th generation to run the firm and has himself been in the industry for 45 years.

Click on this link for an earlier post I made about Newcomb’s.  Gerald gave me open access to their archives, which were amazing to see and includes the famous, Newcomb’s War Diary, surely a document of national significance.

‘The family has served the great and the good for almost 180 years. Figures such as Charles Dickens, Lord Kitchener, Lord Byron and Lord Tennyson have enjoyed the service we offer – our workrooms were a hive of activity as we created shirts for King Edward VII!’

This historic business fits into our Chatham Placemaking Project primarily because of its strong association with our route and the long association with style, craft and a strong sense of local community – Newcomb’s also had a Ladies Clothes Shop on Railway Street – the advertising for the business and associated images from their archives was inspirational.

F & H Newcomb had premises on the corner of High Street and Globe Lane and Ladies Shop on Railway Street. Image: F & H Newcomb Archive

F & H Newcomb Print Advertising. Image: By kind permission of Gerald Newcomb, F & H Newcomb Archive

 

F & H Newcomb. Associated Trade Print Advertising. Image: By kind permission of Gerald Newcomb, F & H Newcomb Archive

 

F & H Newcomb. Associated Trade Print Magazine September 1934. Image: By kind permission of Gerald Newcomb, F & H Newcomb Archive

 

F & H Newcomb. Associated Trade Print Advertising. Image: By kind permission of Gerald Newcomb, F & H Newcomb Archive

F & H Newcomb. Associated Trade Print Advertising. Image: By kind permission of Gerald Newcomb, F & H Newcomb Archive

 

…and so, back to our Magazine Pages…

 

Draft Magazine – Pages 14 & 15 V1 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping.

We love Thomas Waghorn…we also appointed a performance Poet, Justin Coe, to come up with a suitably witty and succinct take on our journey down Railway Street to the River, which he performed in the street in a lively film by Simon Williams. Click here for a link to the film.   “The Overland Route c/o Thomas Waghorn’. 

 

Draft Magazine – Page 15 Option V1 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping.

 

Draft Magazine – Page 15 Option V2 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping.

 

Draft Magazine – Pages 16 & 17 V1 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping.

 

Draft Magazine – Pages 18 & 19 V1 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping. Archive Image: Lady in Fur Coat on Military Road by Kind Permission of MALSC

 

Draft Magazine – Pages 20 & 21 V1 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping.

 

Draft Magazine – Pages 22 & 23 V1 : THESE ARE OUR STREETS. Image: Christopher Tipping.

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Tipping – Practice Update

Tuesday 3rd May 2017

“This is what I do”…

Chatham Placemaking Project – Left to Right – Project Artists: Xtina Lamb, Christopher Tipping, Simon Williams, Rob Young

A review of current and recently completed works –

I am an experienced Artist working in Public Realm, Urban Regeneration and Healthcare environments for Local Authorities, NHS Trusts and the Private Sector.

My projects exhibit contrasting variations in scale, budgets and delivery programmes. They illustrate how I can creatively collaborate within and successfully contribute to a variety of multi-disciplinary teams working in diverse locations and communities.

What underpins my approach to every project however, is a passion for contextually driven creative research and site analysis with which to inform, influence or drive a project forward. What actually delivers the project thereafter is an ability and a desire to collaborate from the outset, respectful of and creatively responsive to the contribution of all members of a client group.

I want to be involved in projects which create spaces and places which resonate with the people who will ultimately use them and which enhances their personal enjoyment and experience of it.

Click on the project titles for links to more detailed information.

 

CHATHAM PLACEMAKING PROJECT Public Realm and Regeneration – Status: Ongoing

Commissioned by Medway Council & Network Rail

Francis Knight Art Consultants

LDA Design & Project Centre

T Loughman Building and Civil Engineering Contractor

Hardscape

Chatham Placemaking Project. Draft Magazine page for ‘A Circle of Words in a Military Square’.

Chatham Placemaking Project. Draft Magazine page for ‘St John’s Steps & Crossing’. Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

SOUTHAMPTON STATION QUARTER NORTH – Transport & Public Realm – Status: Completed

Commissioned by Southampton City Council and Balfour Beatty Living Places

CH2MHill Halcrow 

Balfour Beatty

Hardscape

Cornish Concrete Products

Michael Grubb Studios

Parose Projects

Southampton Station Quarter North – Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Station Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

HARRISON PARK, ORCHARD PARK, HULL – Extra Care Housing Scheme – digitally printed glazing vinyl and wall mounted work – Status: Ongoing

Commissioned by Riverside UK , Hull City Council & Wates Living Space 

RKL Public Art Consultants 

VGL – Vinyl Graphics Ltd

Croft Goode Architects

Re-Form Landscape Architects

Detail: Glazing Vinyl installation Harrison Park, Hall Rd, Hull Extra Care. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Detail: Glazing Vinyl installation Harrison Park, Hall Rd, Hull Extra Care. Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

LITTLEMORE MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, OXFORD – Wenric Ward, digitally printed glazing vinyl – Status: Ongoing

Commissioned by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust & Artscape 

Vinyl Graphics Ltd

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

TAMESIDE NEW MACMILLAN UNIT  – Status: Completed

Commissioned by Tameside & Glossop Integrated Care NHS

Willis Newson Arts & Health Consultancy 

IBI Group Architects Rochdale, UK 

KKE Architects

John Turner Construction Group

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit at Tameside Hospital – Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

KINGSBRIDGE LANE, SOUTHAMPTON – Public Realm project currently in development. An extension of the Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Status: Ongoing

Commissioned by Southampton City Council & Balfour Beatty Living Places

Hardscape

Kingsbridge Lane, Southampton. Draft sketch: Text embedded into basalt paving. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Kingsbridge Lane, Southampton. Draft Concept sketch: Stainless Steel screening wall with text. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North – Solent Design Awards 2016

Southampton Station Quarter North was shortlisted for the 2016 Solent Design Awards, which were awarded in November 2016 – A much needed update on the project. Better late than never !

Southampton Station Quarter North – Public Realm. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Although our project was not one of the winners… it was very encouraging that the collaborative approach which delivered the project and the role of our Champions Group, which endured throughout the build programme was recognised via the shortlist process.

‘The Solent Design Awards are all about the encouragement of quality place-making; schemes that create special places, lift communities, create richer experiences … not just iconic buildings, but also the places in-between’.

The following set of images from the site were produced by Wilson Massie of Balfour Beatty Living Places – thanks Wilson !

Southampton Station Quarter North – Station Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Station Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Station Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Station Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Station Forecourt, Southbrook Road. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Amphitheatre Steps, Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Amphitheatre Steps, Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Amphitheatre Steps, Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Amphitheatre Steps, Frobisher House Forecourt. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – Views from Wyndham Court. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Commercial Road from Wyndham Court. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Commercial Road from Wyndham Court. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Commercial Road from Wyndham Court. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Commercial Road from Wyndham Court. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Commercial Road from Wyndham Court. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Commercial Road. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Southampton Station Quarter North – View along Blechynden Terrace towards the Station. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

The artwork ‘Canal Shore’ runs for almost 200m along the South side of Blechynden Terrace. Bespoke extra wide Black Basalt kerbs are inset with white granite text referencing the site.

Quarter North – View of Basalt Kerb along Blechynden Terrace towards the Station. Image: Wilson Massie. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

With thanks to Hardscape for their excellent collaboration on the ‘Canal Shore’ artwork.

 

 

‘Canal Shore’ is almost complete…

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Monday 28th September 2015 – Station Quarter Visit – 

The kerbside artwork ‘Canal Shore‘, which is a vital part of the Station Quarter programme, is very nearly completed. Only a short section remains to be finished, once the Station Forecourt area is completed. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long black basalt kerb with inset granite text, which traces the route of the former Southampton to Salisbury Canal and also happens to be the line of  the historic shoreline of the River Test Estuary.

The narrative refers to places, people and events which have marked the development of this landscape. Importantly, the work is also a strategic part of the wayfinding and placemaking ambitions for the Station Quarter project, as it makes an emphatic statement along the main east to west pedestrian route to the Station from the Above Bar area of the city and the Cultural Quarter.

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. 'Canal Shore' is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. ‘Canal Shore’ is a 205m long bespoke basalt kerb detail with inset granite text, running along Blechynden Terrace. Artist : Christopher Tipping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Station Quarter North check-up visit –

Monday 28th September 2015, Station Quarter North, Southampton – 

It’s been a while since I posted an update on the Station Quarter Project

Station Quarter  - A new Gateway to Southampton. Works on site - Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter – A new Gateway to Southampton. Works on site – Image:Christopher Tipping

I met up on site with Simon Taylor – Urban Design Manager, Balfour Beatty Living Places and Pete Boustred  – Transport Policy & Sustainable Travel Team Leader at Southampton City Council. I was first commissioned to work on the interpretive and site responsive elements of the project by Simon at BBLP in 2012.  We have worked together several times previously in the City. BBLP are delivering the project for Southampton City Council.

Massive changes since my last visit if you look at earlier posts, but brilliant to see the project coming together so well. The amphitheatre steps, part of the Phase 2 works on Wyndham Place have arrived and have been lifted into place. There are a number of other structures still with the manufacturer and these are expected to arrive over the coming weeks. The installation of the large-scale  bespoke cast concrete benches, amphitheatre steps and retaining structures manufactured by CCP will continue over the coming weeks. Hopefully I will get down to Southampton again soon to record more progress.

Station Quarter North, Southampton. The view on exiting the Station.  Bespoke cast concrete works being installed on the Station Forecourt as part pf the new public realm and transport hub. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. The view on exiting the Station.
Bespoke cast concrete works being installed on the Station Forecourt as part pf the new public realm and transport hub. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

What was a real pain was that although it was a brilliant blue day – this part of the site was in deep shadow, so the images are a bit too dark to do the work justice !

2015-09-28 15.22.09

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke Cast Concrete Amphitheatre Steps during installation at Wyndham Place. Image:Christopher Tipping

Other cast concrete works are also on site –

These benches are on the Station Forecourt, immediately as you enter or exit the Station building. This is one section of a large curving two tier bench and way-finding feature within the scheme.

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke cast concrete two tier radius bench awaiting final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke cast concrete two tier radius bench awaiting final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke cast concrete two tier radius bench awaiting final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke cast concrete two tier radius bench awaiting final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke cast concrete two tier radius bench in multiple sections awaiting final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke cast concrete two tier radius bench in multiple sections awaiting final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on the Station Forecourt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on Commercial Road. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on Commercial Road. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on Commercial Road. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on Commercial Road. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on Commercial Road. Image:Christopher Tipping

Station Quarter North, Southampton. Bespoke four piece cast concrete radius bench during final installation on Commercial Road. Image:Christopher Tipping

 

 

 

Finally, a blue sky day…

Thursday 10th September 2015 – A meeting at the  Royal Dockyard Library, Chatham

This is my 5th visit to Chatham – and the first blue sky day ! – so I had to put this image in…

This is the junction of the High Street, Chatham, with Railway Street and Military Road. The Halifax is on the left and the red brick gable end of Mountbatten House looms large in the centre. Image:Christopher Tipping

This is the junction of the High Street, Chatham, with Railway Street and Military Road. The Halifax is on the left and the red brick gable end of Mountbatten House looms large in the centre. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Halifax building at the junction of High Street, Chatham and Military Road has elephants carved on its facade. Have you seen them? Image:Christopher Tipping

The Halifax building at the junction of High Street, Chatham and Military Road has elephants carved on its facade. Have you seen them? Image:Christopher Tipping

At the Dockyards I was drawn to the activity at Turks Shipyard, which is a fully working yard. The light coming through the roof and riverside doors was beautiful.

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Turks Shipyard within the Historic Dockyard site at Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Dry Dock, Historic Dockyard, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Dry Dock, Historic Dockyard, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Dry Dock, Historic Dockyard, Chatham. Constructed of massive bespoke granite blocks. Image:Christopher Tipping

Dry Dock, Historic Dockyard, Chatham. Constructed of massive bespoke granite blocks. Image:Christopher Tipping

 

 

 

UCA, Fort Pitt to Fort Amherst and the Great Lines

Napoleon & me at Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Napoleon & me at Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Tuesday 8th September 2015 – University of the Creative Arts, Fort Pitt – the bigger picture

My wife Shelly Goldsmith is also my partner in tippinggoldsmith and a Lecturer in the School of Fashion – Textiles:Print at UCA Rochester. The University’s building sit on the site of Fort Pitt, which overlooks Chatham, Rochester and the Medway from a strategically high vantage point above the town.

I walked up to the site from Chatham Station, which is only 5mins walk away, passing by Dickens’ House on Ordnance Terrace on the way. I was allowed up onto the upper floors and the terrace, which offers spectacular views across Chatham and Rochester, the Medway and The Historic Dockyards beyond. This vantage point makes clear why Chatham developed as it did as a strategically important defensive site on the River.

Chatham Lines – comprising a number of impressive defensive structures, earthworks and Forts, developed since Napoleonic times to protect the Docks from a landward attack, are clearly visible in the landscape and although now long past any active role in the defence of the country, have served to shape the town and its inhabitants in both its topography, physical landscape and social history.

Chatham and the Historic Dockyard as seen from the upper floors of the University for the Creative Arts, Rochester Campus at Fort Pitt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham and the Historic Dockyard as seen from the upper floors of the University for the Creative Arts, Rochester Campus at Fort Pitt. Image:Christopher Tipping

 

Chatham and the Historic Dockyard as seen from the upper floors of the University for the Creative Arts, Rochester Campus at Fort Pitt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham and the Historic Dockyard as seen from the upper floors of the University for the Creative Arts, Rochester Campus at Fort Pitt. Image:Christopher Tipping

The copper green copula of the Brook Theatre, Chatham can be seen in the above image at the top right section of the image to the left of the red brick office clock Mountbatten House, the dominant landmark in the Town.

Chatham and the Historic Dockyard as seen from the upper floors of the University for the Creative Arts, Rochester Campus at Fort Pitt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham and the Historic Dockyard as seen from the upper floors of the University for the Creative Arts, Rochester Campus at Fort Pitt. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham Waterfront and Gun Wharf as seen from Sun Pier. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham Waterfront and Gun Wharf as seen from Sun Pier. Image:Christopher Tipping

Sun Pier and Sun Pier House, Chatham. 

Chatham Waterfront and Gun Wharf as seen from Sun Pier. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham Waterfront and Gun Wharf as seen from Sun Pier. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Waterfront Pumping Station and Brook Theatre as seen from Sun Pier, Chatham. If ever something cried out for some form of intervention – then the Pumping Station takes poll position on the list. An eyesore on the waterfront, it could become an icon and focal point.

Sun Pier, Chatham with warning sign. Image:Christopher Tipping

Sun Pier, Chatham with warning sign. Image:Christopher Tipping

The empty timber deck of Sun Pier, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The empty timber deck of Sun Pier, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Although historically, the waterfront and area around Sun Pier would have been dominated by warehouses and river bases businesses. The industrial shed which houses Staples, does the site and its potential no favours here. Some softening landscape works and green screening may help.

Historic kerbs, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Historic kerbs, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Walking back from Sun Pier to the Waterfront and Bus Station, these historic granite kerbs and cobbles jump out for their simplicity, texture and purpose.

I wanted to see the town from the opposite vantage point of Fort Amherst adjacent to Great Lines Park , formerly known as the Field of Fire , so walked across to the Brook Theatre and beyond to the Town Hall Gardens, the former Town Burial Ground. Prior to 1828, the site was a former Rope Works.

The Brook Theatre, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Brook Theatre, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Decorative wrought ironwork gates inside the Brook Theatre, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Decorative wrought ironwork gates inside the Brook Theatre, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Decorative wrought ironwork gates inside the Brook Theatre, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Decorative wrought ironwork gates inside the Brook Theatre, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The gates to the Town Hall Gardens, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The gates to the Town Hall Gardens, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Just a short walk further up the hill is the path and steps leading up to the Great Lines Park and Fort Amherst.

Several steep fights of steps meet the visitor to the Great Lines Heritage Park and Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Several steep fights of steps meet the visitor to the Great Lines Heritage Park and Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Napoleonic brick faced defensive structures of Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Napoleonic brick faced defensive structures of Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Fort Amherst Signage, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

Fort Amherst Signage, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

A detail of the Fort Amherst Signage found at Great Lines Park, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

A detail of the Fort Amherst Signage found at Great Lines Park, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

A view of the University for the Creative Arts at Fort Pitt, Rochester, taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

A view of the University for the Creative Arts at Fort Pitt, Rochester, taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

UCA at Fort Pitt is at top centre of this image. The copper green copula of the Brook Theatre is at the centre bottom.

The pedestrian route from Chatham Railway Station to The Paddock and Bus Station can be made out in this image taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The pedestrian route from Chatham Railway Station to The Paddock and Bus Station can be made out in this image taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The pedestrian route from Chatham Railway Station to The Paddock and Bus Station can be made out in this image taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The pedestrian route from Chatham Railway Station to The Paddock and Bus Station can be made out in this image taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The pedestrian route from Chatham Railway Station to The Paddock and Bus Station can be made out in this annotated image taken from Belvedere Battery,  Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

The pedestrian route from Chatham Railway Station to The Paddock and Bus Station can be made out in this annotated image taken from Belvedere Battery, Fort Amherst, Chatham. Image:Christopher Tipping

in the afternoon I also paid a visit to Chatham Library, which is housed in the Chatham Community Hub, at Gun Wharf – near The Waterfront.

They have a brilliant book on Chatham and it’s history – “The Story of a Dockyard Town” by James Presnail, published by the Corporation of Chatham in 1952 MCMLII. Ref:942.23 CHA. I was much taken by it’s last paragraph on social responsibility.

 

 

 

 

Medway Archives & Local Studies Centre

Thursday 3rd September 2015 – Medway Archives & Local Studies Centre, Stood. 

I had an appointment to meet the archivist at MALSC to review their photographic collection – particularly in regard to Railway Street and Military Street. I took a number of digital images from old photographs, but will require permission to post them on the blog. Hopefully, I can do this in due course.

Old OS Maps of the area were of particular interest as these obviously mapped out – some in great detail – large areas of the site where building had been lost during ‘development’ and / or razed to the ground by fire or neglect. Again – watch this space as i hope to post these images too.

Of particular interest were the OS 1848 Board of Health Map and the 1843 Tithe Map.

Chatham Research Visit 2 – a clearer vision

Thursday 3rd September 2015 – Chatham Research Visit No 2 – A clearer vision…

Chatham is making more sense ! – the topography here is incredibly helpful in aiding navigation around the town. Geography, topography and the particular curve of the River Medway provided the strategic advantage which led to the exponential growth of the Docks and town from the early part of the 18th Century. The day today was clearer and brighter – unlike my first visit when it poured down all day – this really makes a considerable difference! Still walking as much as possible – by far the best way of getting to grips with a place – today I went as far as Strood, via Rochester and visited the Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre.

The following images again trace the pedestrian route from the Rail Station to the Waterfront.

Chatham Railway Station -  Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham Railway Station –
Image:Christopher Tipping

A short walk from Chatham Railway Station and in clear view from the station entrance is Ordnance Terrace and the house where Charles Dickens lived for several years as a small boy. Image:Christopher Tipping

A short walk from Chatham Railway Station and in clear view from the station entrance is Ordnance Terrace and the house where Charles Dickens lived for several years as a small boy. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham Railway Station and Railway Street looking from Ordnance Terrace. Image:Christopher Tipping

Chatham Railway Station and Railway Street looking from Ordnance Terrace. Image:Christopher Tipping

At the centre of the image, the Viaduct with New Road can be clearly seen, as can the tower of St John’s Church and the red brick monolith of Mountbatten House on Military Street, adjacent to the new Bus Station.

A wide panoramic shot of Chatham Railway Station and Railway Street from Ordnance Terrace. Image:Christopher Tipping

A wide panoramic shot of Chatham Railway Station and Railway Street from Ordnance Terrace. Image:Christopher Tipping

Pedestrians walking up to Chatham Rail Station along Railway Street. Image:Christopher Tipping

Pedestrians walking up to Chatham Rail Station along Railway Street. Image:Christopher Tipping

Pedestrians walking up to Chatham Rail Station along Railway Street. Image:Christopher Tipping

Pedestrians walking up to Chatham Rail Station along Railway Street. Image:Christopher Tipping

The roads around the Railway Station and Railway Street are heavily trafficked by cars, buses and lorries, making for a poor pedestrian experience. Image:Christopher Tipping

The roads around the Railway Station and Railway Street are heavily trafficked by cars, buses and lorries, making for a poor pedestrian experience. Image:Christopher Tipping

A view from the Viaduct over Railway Street looking towards the Railway Station and the Alexandra Hotel. The older image is circa 1905.  Image:Christopher Tipping

A view from the Viaduct over Railway Street looking towards the Railway Station and the Alexandra Hotel. The older image is circa 1905. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Alexandra Hotel at 53 Railway Street, Chatham has stood on this site for over a Century. Image:Christopher Tipping

The Alexandra Hotel at 53 Railway Street, Chatham has stood on this site for over a Century. Image:Christopher Tipping

The statue of Thomas Fletcher Waghorn was raised on Railway Street, Chatham in 1888. Image:Christopher Tipping

The statue of Thomas Fletcher Waghorn was raised on Railway Street, Chatham in 1888. Image:Christopher Tipping

Thomas Fletcher Waghorn (1800–1850), whose statue stands in Chatham, Kent, was a postal pioneer who developed a new route from Great Britain to India. Waghorn’s route reduced the journey from 16,000 miles, via the Cape of Good Hope to 6,000 miles: from three months to between 35 and 45 days. Waghorn was born in Chatham, England, and baptised at St Mary’s Church on 16 July 1800″. Wikipedia

Interestingly, Thomas appears to be pointing the way to the Town Centre and Waterfront to pedestrians coming down from the Rail Station. Good man ! –

The Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, with detailed ironwork balustrade. Image: Christopher Tipping

The Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, with detailed ironwork balustrade. Image: Christopher Tipping

A view from the Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, with a detailed view through the ironwork balustrade. Image: Christopher Tipping

A view from the Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, with a detailed view through the ironwork balustrade. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Shadows cast by the cast iron balustrade of the Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

Shadows cast by the cast iron balustrade of the Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

A panoramic view of Gibralter Hill and Railway Street, Chatham, looking up to wards the Railway Station. Image:Christopher Tipping

A panoramic view of Gibralter Hill and Railway Street, Chatham, looking up to wards the Railway Station. Image:Christopher Tipping

On the New Road Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, looking to wards the Waterfront. Image:Christopher Tipping

On the New Road Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, looking to wards the Waterfront. Image:Christopher Tipping

On the New Road Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, looking down Railway Street towards St John's Church on the left and the Town Centre. Image:Christopher Tipping

On the New Road Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, looking down Railway Street towards St John’s Church on the left and the Town Centre. Image:Christopher Tipping

A view from the New Road Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, looking down  towards St John's Church and the Town Centre. Image:Christopher Tipping

A view from the New Road Viaduct over Railway Street, Chatham, looking down towards St John’s Church and the Town Centre. Image:Christopher Tipping

The junction of Waterfront Way with the A2 at St John's Church, Chatham, where the highway has been punched through Railway Street, creates a hostile zone for pedestrians and effectively cuts off the lower part of Railway Street and the Town Centre, from the upper section and the Railway Station. Image:Christopher Tipping

The junction of Waterfront Way with the A2 at St John’s Church, Chatham, where the highway has been punched through Railway Street, creates a hostile zone for pedestrians and effectively cuts off the lower part of Railway Street and the Town Centre, from the upper section and the Railway Station. Image:Christopher Tipping

Where Railway Street is dissected by the A2 by St Joh's Church in Chatham, pedestrians have to navigate a complex & carbuncle-like step/ramp/concrete barrier arrangement to gain access to and from lower Railway Street and the retail centre of the town. Image:Christopher Tipping

Where Railway Street is dissected by the A2 by St Joh’s Church in Chatham, pedestrians have to navigate a complex & carbuncle-like step/ramp/concrete barrier arrangement to gain access to and from lower Railway Street and the retail centre of the town. Image:Christopher Tipping

Wrought iron gates remain intact at the courtyard entrance to the old Post Office Building on lower Railway Street, Chatham. The building is a handsome addition to the fabric of the street, but is currently empty. Image:Christopher Tipping

Wrought iron gates remain intact at the courtyard entrance to the old Post Office Building on lower Railway Street, Chatham. The building is a handsome addition to the fabric of the street, but is currently empty. Image:Christopher Tipping

The retail units along the lower section of Railway Street, Chatham, appear busy and animated. The streetscape is abruptly interrupted and stifled by the A2 cutting and awkward steps, ramps and concrete wall. Image:Christopher Tipping

The retail units along the lower section of Railway Street, Chatham, appear busy and animated. The streetscape is abruptly interrupted and stifled by the A2 cutting and awkward steps, ramps and concrete wall. Image:Christopher Tipping

Architectural text and detailing on the upper stories of extant buildings along Railway Street, provide clues to the rich legacy of activity and usage in the area.

The lower section of Military Road, Chatham ought to be a highly activated, fluid, dynamic and versatile public space with the Brook Theatre as the anchor building and focus.  Unfortunately the space is a dead zone, underused and slightly unsettling. Image:Christopher Tipping

The lower section of Military Road, Chatham ought to be a highly activated, fluid, dynamic and versatile public space with the Brook Theatre as the anchor building and focus. Unfortunately the space is a dead zone, underused and slightly unsettling. Image:Christopher Tipping

A panoramic image of the lower section of Military Road, Chatham, which ought to be a highly activated, fluid, dynamic and versatile public space with the Brook Theatre as the anchor building and focus along with the adjacent Bus Station. Unfortunately the space is something of a dead zone, underused and slightly unsettling. Image:Christopher Tipping

A panoramic image of the lower section of Military Road, Chatham, which ought to be a highly activated, fluid, dynamic and versatile public space with the Brook Theatre as the anchor building and focus along with the adjacent Bus Station. Unfortunately the space is something of a dead zone, underused and slightly unsettling. Image:Christopher Tipping