Tag Archives: Francis Knight

Spritsail Barges of the Medway…and other Rochester Riverside Stories (2 of 3)

‘Mr Gill showed me a very fine model of their barge Centaur, a 50-tonner built by Messrs. Gill & Son, specially for the 1899 Medway barge Race, in the astonishing time of 6 weeks.” 

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

In his wonderfully evocative book ‘Spritsail Barges of Thames and Medway’, published in 1948, Edgar J March paints a highly detailed picture of Barge activity and life on the Medway. Many of these Barges started life in the boatyards of Rochester.

“Staunch and well built though a barge may be, each year sees a toll taken. Some yield at last to the cold embrace of the sea, whose caresses they have so long resisted, others steal quietly up some lonely creek to nose gently into the malodorous mud and settle down into their last berth, gradually to moulder away, forgotten by all save their one time masters, and perhaps, some sentimental fool like myself, who will gaze down on their rotting timbers and imagination see spars clothed with red-brown sails and hulls vibrant with life as they thrash there way round the Foreland.” 

Describing the excitement and thrill of the Medway Barge Races – “The course was from Hoo Marshes to the West Oaze Buoy and back to the Sun Pier at Chatham, a distance of about thirty five miles…A strong easterly wind was blowing, and in Long Reach Verona’s bowsprit snapped off short, but the crew cleared away the wreckage and setting a jib topsail as a staysail, carried on to come sixth in their class.” Edgar J March. 

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

Referencing a painting by T.B. Hardy, 1874, Edgar March goes on to describe the Medway as, “When this picture was painted, marine artists had little need to look for subjects. The Medway was alive with sailing craft : dainty little topsail schooners, picturesque collier brigs with apple bows and dingy canvas, barques from Scandinavia, bringing pine-scented timber from the Baltic to Rochester, and above all, barges innumerable, threading their way through the maze of traffic. One hundred a tide was no uncommon sight, and what a joy to a sail-lover that galaxy of russet, brown and ochre canvas must have been, many with various devices emblazoned on their mainsails – Lees’ stumpies had the white horse of Kent rampant on ebony coloured sails – all either hurrying down on the ebb or beating up against wind and tide. Now gone forever.”

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

…and “In  those far-off days, watermen, or “goozers”, to use their riverside nick-name, plied their trade in skiffs”. Edgar J March

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

William Higham was born in 1838 in Lewes Sussex. On 27/10/1864 he married Fanny Elizabeth Blake in Strood, nr, Rochester. By 1881 they had 9 children.

William was a Barge Builder and they lived in a private house on Victoria Street, Rochester. The location of his Yard is show on the OS map of 1898 on Blue Boar Hard, just above the Pier. ADA & EDITH is just one of many barges built here between 1876 and 1901.

Detail of OS Map 1898 showing land prior to development as Cory’s Coal & Rail Depot & Wharf. Rochester Riverside Industry. Reproduced by Kind Permission of MALSC.

 PROVIDENCE

FOX HOUND

MAID OF KENT

ANNIE & ALICE

CHARLEY BAKER

HERBERT & HAROLD

ADA & EDITH

ANSWERS

SILVER WEDDING

MABEL MAUD

VENTURA

FIVE BROTHERS

DOROTHY

 

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

‘WALRUS’ & ‘NELLIE’ were two portable conveyors owned by William Cory & Son, Coal Factors, at Cory’s Wharf, used for transporting stone aggregates from Barge to Train. These aggregates were known as Fines, Nuts & Cobbles.

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

“It has been my privilege to go over and see the marvellous machinery for loading and unloading coal. The five large cranes, when seen at work bowing their stately heads, look like dancers executing a minuet; …when in repose, standing like so many soldiers on sentry duty, with fixed bayonets. What a contrast to see the way a collier is unloaded by these cranes, as compared with the old coal whippers’ days! A coal boat seems scarcely to draw alongside the wharf before it is steaming away again”. Edwin Harris Guides to Old Rochester, Pub. 1930 No. 27 Part 1. (Ref: ROC. 942.23 HAR The Riverside. Harris/Edwin. MALSC).

 

Cory’s Coal Depot with 2 abandoned cranes from the original 5. November 1969. Black & White Photograph. Rochester Riverside Industry. Reproduced by Kind Permission of MALSC.

 

Detail of OS Map 1932 showing Cory’s Coal & Rail Depot & Wharf. Rochester Riverside Industry. Reproduced by Kind Permission of MALSC.

 

The five cranes were originally positioned along Cory’s Wharf on the far right hand side of the above OS Map of 1932

 

Detail of OS Map 1898 showing land prior to development as Cory’s Coal & Rail Depot & Wharf. Rochester Riverside Industry. Reproduced by Kind Permission of MALSC.

The earlier OS Map of 1898 records the same site some 30 years previously as Chatham Goods Yard. The site occupied by Cory’s Wharf is immediately below Blue Boar Pier along the HWMOT line.

 

Draft designs for granite or cast iron paving slabs. Rochester Riverside. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

 

Dunlin…A Salt Marsh Bird

 

 

‘The Medway Estuary is believed to be the most important area in North Kent for wintering wildfowl in numbers of international significance. The Saltmarsh serves as a roosting area for waders at high tide. Several scarce plant species include: golden samphire, perennial glasswort and one-flowered glasswort. The estuary is one of the best places in Britain for the study of glassworts. The grazing marsh has breeding and wintering birds of interest; the former include lapwing, redshank, pochard, mallard and gadwall, while in winter large flocks of may wildfowl and wader species are present.

Ref: Environmental Stresses and Resource Use in Coastal Urban and Peri Urban Regions. DPSIR Approach to SECOA’s 17 Case Studies.

These overwintering birds, along with thousands of others migrating or breeding species have been present on our site, however the numbers of Dunlin and other birds have undergone a decline, ostensibly to do with habitat loss and disturbance, which is of course of great concern.

 

 

 

 

The Granite Bench at Rogallo Place –

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

A simple monolithic granite bench was also commissioned for Rogallo Place by Optivo Homes. A beautiful honed finish is sandblasted with the name of the building alongside detailed motifs reflecting the glazing vinyls of the building’s interior.

The bench was manufactured and supplied in collaboration with Hardscape, as ever, great to work with.

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Hardscape

The image above was taken during production at Hardscape’s Facility at Long Marston, near Stratford Upon Avon.

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Hardscape

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Granite Bench Drawings by Hardscape for Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Hardscape

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Granite Bench by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Francis Knight Art Consultants

All done & dusted at Rogallo Place

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place has now completed on site with all artworks successfully in place. Many thanks to Francis Knight for the usual brilliant arts management and collaboration, and to Optivo Homes for the opportunity.

A big thanks also to my  specialist manufacturers & collaborators, VGL & Hardscape for their invaluable contribution.

All images are copyright of and by Richard Gooding Photography

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Rogallo Place Glazing Vinyl by Artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Richard Gooding

Some Chatham Words

You may have seen some of our work embedded into the streetscape along Railway Street. Large scale granite kerbs contain words sandblasted or inlaid into the surface. You may wonder what these words mean, or how they relate to you. Here is a short explanation of how they came about. 

We often talk about words having weight – of text being ‘set in stone’… or ’engraved in stone’…suggesting gravitas, importance, longevity, …we all like a funny ‘one liner’…colloquial, local…distinct Chatham voices…

Well, here in Chatham your words really are being set in stone…for all to read…for years to come –

Chatham Placemaking Project. “A Chatham Barber called Long John…”. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Placemaking Project. “Colin carried coal…”. Image: Christopher Tipping. Words: Rob Young

You may know that the aim of this public realm project was to upgrade the route from Chatham Station to the Waterfront. This includes pedestrian and cycle routes as well as crossing points, upgrading paving materials, improving steps and ramps, opening up the public realm and streamlining access and pedestrian permeability. This work was driven by Francis Knight, Public Art Consultants & our project collaborators and consultants to Medway Council, LDA Design and Project Centre. 

We have worked within these parameters, using the language of public realm and materials, which are robust and stand the test of time. We have created a quiet ‘narrative’ thread – a story about Chatham –  & more specifically about events and places along this route.

We wanted the streets to speak quietly, confidently & with good humour about Chatham…WHAT MAKES A TOWN ?…THESE ARE OUR STREETS…part memorial, part living voice…but mostly a celebration of the rich heritage and community of Chatham.

Chatham Placemaking Project. 57 Submarines.
Image: Christopher Tipping.

As an artist and designer of public spaces, this project has been an opportunity to influence our surroundings in a way that ‘speaks’ of Chatham and its people. We mostly take our pavements for granted, but these spaces have often developed from historic pathways and tracks linking communities and towns across the wider region. They have a resonance and a ‘voice’, …and echo with history. 

The route from the Station to the Waterfront takes us down Railways Street & Military Road – in doing so we pass several key places, such as New Cut ( a former farmyard), St John’s ( a Grade II Listed Waterloo Church) – Military Square, considered the Heart of the Town. At these important sites, we have made interventions to articulate the granite kerb in ways which are expressive and of interest, whilst still maintaining functionality.

We were keen to hear and to record everyday voices …words spoken by ordinary people – such as ‘the girl who cried when she lost her phone and then cried again when she found it’... ‘the lovey barmaid’ …or ‘Colin, the man who carried coal for charity’…these are the voices of people on the street, passers by, people shopping & passing the time of day. We engaged with people directly in conversation, we overheard the conversations of others, we wrote down and recorded stories and anecdotes we were told.

I was very fortunate to collaborate with other artists on this project. Filmmaker Simon Williams succinctly and with an understated eye for visual language and movement, cleverly framed our project parameters and vision in a series of short films, whilst printmaker Xtina Lamb rendered our architectural vision into graphic patterns & motifs used throughout the scheme. Both artists also live in Chatham, bringing their individual & unique perspectives to play. However, it was the award winning writer Rob Young, who contributed significantly to the embedded text. An astute, profound and funny wordsmith with an ability to engage anyone and everyone, turning their words into poetry along the way.

“The knitter. Whose name is Pearl.

The woman. Who uses the word ‘like?’ As like, punctuation?

The woman. Who said sorry. When you’re the one who pushed in.

The woman. Who draws breath. Then monologues. For an hour.

The waiter. Who had a fling. With a Bride. At her wedding.

The girl. Who cried. All day. When she lost her phone. Then cried again. When she found it.

The boy. Whose Mum. Made him take back the sweets. That he stole.

The man. Who says, I’m mad, me. Who isn’t mad, at all. Just lonely”. Rob Young 2016

 

 

Justin Coe, a poet and writer also contributed, animatedly performing his work directly to camera, whilst walking the route in a film by Simon Williams.

Film still image of Poet & Writer Justin Coe performing his work on Military Road, Chatham. Image: Simon Williams

 

“On his way to his first day of school on Rome Lane

(The name of this road – before the trains came)

And while we’re walking with Dickens – observe the new Church

They’ve called it St Johns. And it will soon be the first

Public building in Chatham lit by electricity!…

Though all the lights went out here by the end of last century…” Justin Coe 2016

 

Local school children & people working in local businesses were asked for their comments. We listened to them & heard their stories. We listened to the sound of their lives. There is an overwhelming sense of common ownership in this project. These words are not ours. They belong to Chatham.

We referenced times past by collaborating with MALSC (Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre) and other local agencies in searching for site specific text, such as the words of famous visitors & local Luminaries such as Charles Dickens, reminiscing about soldiers marching through the town in regimented rows …’

The oversized granite kerbs we have used here become a metaphor for the continuity of the local community – kerbs being critical in holding roads and pavements in place – they are physically important in maintaining the fabric of our environment –they could almost be described as ‘defensive structures’ maintaining the integrity and safety of our public spaces …reminiscent of the Chatham Lines – the historic defensive structures, forts and earthworks, which offered protection to the people of Medway & especially the Chatham Dockyard …

The granite kerb acts as a threshold between various states …of the pedestrian…and the driver, or moving fast or slow – perceptions of safety & danger…often the original granite kerb is often the only thing left in place when pavements and roads have been re-placed or modernised throughout recent history…the kerb maintains the parameters of how public spaces were managed and maintained. These lines of granite are also ‘our other Chatham Lines…’

More of the kerbstone lies buried beneath the surface than on top of it… and so it is also a rather poignant link between the past and the present…where times and events past lie buried beneath out feet –

Chatham Placemaking Project – granite kerbs being installed on Railway Street. Image: Christopher Tipping

Our work in Chatham set out to find and hear voices and words which quietly & evocatively create a sense of place associated with each of our stopping points on the route from the Station to the Paddock… the power of these voices is amplified by the weight and mass of the monolithic granite.

Left in place, these words will still be here in a hundred years from now…

 

Rochester Riverside

I have been recently commissioned by Francis Knight Arts Consultancy, Countryside Properties (UK) Ltd and The Hyde Group, to make work for Phases 1 & 2 of the Rochester Riverside Development

I am working on this exciting architectural collaboration with the wider project team and more directly with BPTW Architects & Francis Knight.

I have completed a research and development phase and presented the outcome to the client team along with proposals for engaging with the site via artwork in cast iron and granite, embedded into footpaths to houses and threshold strips to apartment blocks. The draft presentation can be seen here: 180215 TIPPING RR PROPOSALS SM

My research has focussed primarily on the rich industrial heritage & legacy of the Rochester Riverside site. Much of this information was found within the archives and collections of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre at Strood.

I have also consulted with other notable local agencies and organisations, such as Rochester Cathedral Library, the Guildhall Museum and John K Austin, a local Artist, writer and historian.

 

Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017

This week saw the publication of Issue 10 of Medway 1 Magazine, which is published by 3Fox International Ltd 

This issue covers Regeneration Projects being delivered in Medway and Chatham in particular.

The Chatham Placemaking Project is featured on Pages 17 – 22.

Christopher Hazeldine, Production Manager at 3Fox International Ltd has kindly allowed us to publish the following images:

‘These are our Streets’

Front Cover: Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017 3Fox International Ltd. Chatham Placemaking Project. Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

‘Future Routes’ Page 17: Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017 3Fox International Ltd. Chatham Placemaking Project. Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

‘Future Routes’ Page 18: Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017 3Fox International Ltd. Chatham Placemaking Project. Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

‘Future Routes’ Page 19: Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017 3Fox International Ltd. Chatham Placemaking Project. Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

‘Future Routes’ Pages 20-21: Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017 3Fox International Ltd. Chatham Placemaking Project. Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

‘Future Routes’ Page 22: Medway 1 Magazine Issue 10 2017 3Fox International Ltd. Chatham Placemaking Project. Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

 

Chatham Patterns

There are many ways in which the Chatham Placemaking Project can communicate with the local community. Large scale visuals can be really effective – such as these mock-up ideas drafted onto a series of primesight billboards on Railway Street.

The Chatham Big Screen too would provide a great opportunity for us, as we could post film and moving images as well as sound.

Chatham Patterns - Mock-up artworks have been used on these primesight billboards on Railway Street Chatham to illustrate the kind of work we could take into the community. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns – Mock-up artworks have been used on these primesight billboards on Railway Street Chatham to illustrate the kind of work we could take into the community.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns - Mock-up artworks have been drafted onto these primesight billboards on Railway Street Chatham to illustrate the kind of work we could take into the community. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns – Mock-up artworks have been drafted onto these primesight billboards on Railway Street Chatham to illustrate the kind of work we could take into the community.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

The BIg Screen, Chatham. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

The BIg Screen, Chatham.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns -  Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns –
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping. Historic Dockyards Chatham

Chatham Patterns - Railway Street Chatham.  Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns – Railway Street Chatham.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

The BIg Screen, Chatham. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

The BIg Screen, Chatham.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Pattern - Chatham Historic Dockyard. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Pattern – Chatham Historic Dockyard.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Historic Dockyard. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Historic Dockyard.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns - Chatham Historic Dockyard. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Chatham Patterns – Chatham Historic Dockyard.
Chatham Placemaking Project. Image by Project Lead Artist Christopher Tipping

Creative Consultation

On Friday 6th February 2016 we ran a creative consultation drop-in event in Chatham. These were held at Sun Pier House from 10am – 1pm and then at Nucleus Arts from 2pm to 5pm. We presented the same information as the public consultation events – and the creative consultation events were also open to anyone to attend.

Sun Pier, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

Sun Pier, Chatham. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Chatham and Medway has a lively and very creative and well established arts scene. It is important that we make the project as open and available to all to engage with. The afternoon session at Nucleus Arts turned into an impromptu talk and discussion about the wider regeneration project and the creative contextual research with which we hope to influence and inform the design process. This was really well attended, with some artists and practitioners asking about the temporary programme of commissions which will run prior to the permanent works beginning on site. Engagement in this way is the real catalyst for change, creativity and promoting a common sense of ownership.

A big thanks to Claire Poynter, Natasha Steer and Genevieve Tullberg of Nucleus Arts for making this event a success and providing the space.

‘Another Chatham Line…’ drafts from the creative scope…

These are a few images taken from the Creative Scope work I am doing. These are my artworks / draft plans, created to promote the creative concept.

Chatham Creative Scope - draft artwork and concept development by project artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope – draft artwork and concept development by project artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Christopher Tipping

Concept

The Lead Artist proposes that these historic, physical and social influences will be experienced in the pedestrian journey from the Railway Station, via Railway Street and Military Road to Riverside. It is proposed that this concept approach may manifest itself as an evolving linear narrative, drawn out from within the pavements and pedestrian areas associated with the route. Referencing the nearby Chatham Lines, this new Town Line could demonstrate a series of distinct, yet inter-related events, thresholds and experiences along its course. As interpretive interventions, they will evoke a narrative of resonant references to Chatham itself, becoming a part of the fabric of the street. Where the Chatham Lines were built as defensive structures, this new line will be resolutely ‘enabling’.

 

The Historic Dockyard is inextricably tied to the social and industrial history of Chatham. It is a rich source of inspiration. Architectural forms, both robust and functional continue to influence the creative approach; some structures, such as the Slipway Sheds presenting striking abstract patterns and geometries. Vertical forests of timbers supporting vast and expansive roofs with rectangular glazing apertures, twisted askew by perspective. The Dry Docks are faced in massive blocks of close fitting granite. These materials are shaped by function, yet are hand crafted and bespoke features, imbued with a legacy of local and honed skills, surely a fitting inspiration for a contemporary streetscape here in Chatham.

 

Dickens writes about an enduring military presence on the streets of Chatham.

 

“They walked about the streets in rows or bodies, carrying their heads in exactly the same way, and doing exactly the same thing with their limbs”. “Men were only noticeable by scores, by hundreds, by thousands, rank and file, companies and regiments, detachments, vessels full for exportation”.

 

These closely observed characteristics, played out on the streets of Chatham until very recently, suggest that an echo of these patterns of movement and symmetric formations, displays and manoeuvres are still extant in the pavements, streets and roads of the town. Perhaps this evocative memory could be recalled in new paving finishes and interventions in the streetscene.

 

This creative interpretation not only brings a site-responsive and contemporary narrative to the project, but also dovetails with and adds to a strategic and deliberate approach to inherent wayfinding and placemaking, assisting and strengthening the pedestrian route and the local and visitor experience.

 

This concept applies to the entire Placemaking Masterplan, setting a blueprint for a programme of temporary and permanent commissions to roll out in a phased approach over the development period.

Chatham Creative Scope - draft artwork and concept development by project artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Artist's own

Chatham Creative Scope – draft artwork and concept development by project artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Artist’s own

 

Chatham Creative Scope - draft artwork and concept development by project artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Artist's own

Chatham Creative Scope – draft artwork and concept development by project artist Christopher Tipping. Image: Artist’s own

Chatham Creative Scope – ongoing

It’s a while since I last posted on the project. My creative scope has now been submitted and contains a number of research-led works, including:

Site visits to Chatham, for the purposes of research and site analysis.

A review of local landmarks and key buildings, places and organisations –

Meetings with archivists –

A personal blog –

Pinterest Board of research images and aspirations –

A text based creative analysis made as a contribution to the Masterplan document being prepared by LDA

‘Another Chatham Line…’ – an illustrated creative scope pdf document –

Concept and diagrammatic drawings to accompany and illustrate the creative scope and concept approach –

The work submitted will be added into the supporting documents or as an appendix to the work. We will now be looking towards a public consultation exercise, which is scheduled for early December 2015.

The following images are from draft artworks I have produced, exploring the idea of a thematic pedestrian route from Chatham Station to the Waterfront and The Paddock.

Chatham Creative Scope - artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope – artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope - artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope – artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope - artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope – artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope - artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope – artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope - artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatham Creative Scope – artist sketchbook drafts. Image: Christopher Tipping