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Covers all projects which involve healthcare and well-being, such as Private and NHS Hospitals, Mental Health Centres and related forms of care in the community.

‘Murmuration’, Jubilee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital

I have been associated with Musgrove Park Hospital since 2005, when I was appointed as Lead Artist for External Spaces, a role specifically commissioned to  influence the design process of the Hospital Trust’s 10 year development plan, particularly in regard to external landscape. It resulted in a Design Vision document issued in 2006. This project was managed on behalf of the Trust, by the Art for Life Co-ordinator, Bronwen Gwillim, with whom I collaborated  until 2012, when she left the post.

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The ‘Murmuration’ project, which has just been manufactured & installed by Taunton Fabrications is one element of a wider interpretive art project I made in response to the development & construction of the new Jubilee Building Surgical Unit for Taunton & Somerset NHS Foundation Trust at Musgrove Park Hospital.

 

This new build project was managed by Steven Power, Senior Project Manager, Capital Projects Office on behalf of Taunton & Somerset NHS Foundation Trust. The building was delivered by BAM Construction and designed by BDP Architects. It opened in April 2014.

I was commissioned for this particular project back in January 2010. The proposals for ‘Murmuration’, stood alongside other work I was asked to undertake on the project during this period which included:

 

The patterning, colour and proportion of the zinc panelled external elevations of the new building.

The 70th Anniversary Central Concourse Screen artwork, which certainly needs a better title than this ! See: http://christophertipping.co.uk/category/central-concourse-musgrove-park-hospital/

Hoardings artwork for the new building during its 2 years on site. Some images posted below.

Creative collaboration &  input into the E Tree Panel Project, which used the timber from the iconic Eisenhour Tree planted during WWII (which had to be removed to enable the new build) to create a wall based artwork for the interior of the building.

 

 

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The North West patterned zinc elevation with laser cut steel panels. Image: Taunton Fabrications

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The north west elevation and main entrance as seen from the adjacent graveyard. Image: Taunton Fabrications

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Bicester Community Hospital – draft artworks –

Bicester Community Hospital

We now have a schedule agreed and are working to issue draft artwork for comment and hopefully, approval by this time next week.

Detail: draft artwork -

Detail: draft artwork –

It was agreed that the principle we should follow is to develop a highly visual & primarily figurative narrative, which also provides a privacy screen between the users of the ward rooms and the external courtyards. The courtyard landscapes are brand new, with ground level put to grass and no planting at height to provide cover or privacy screening. This has however provided the opportunity to create a new and imaginary landscape, which bridges the gap between figurative and recognisable details and structures from the external landscape, alongside abstract and original forms and patterns found within the artwork.

The works are to be digitally printed onto optically clear vinyl in layers of opaque and transparent white, with some added colour. The attention to detail will be focussed on a horizontal band across the mid section of the glazing screen to provide privacy. The top section will be left clear, so that uninterrupted views of the sky can be had. We are working closely with Guardian Window Film to manufacture & install the work.

Detail: draft artwork development -

Detail: draft artwork development –

These images are simply the first steps in creating a visual language and narrative for the project. The artwork is being developed as a long rectangular landscape – as a view through a window – . Each of the 10 ward rooms – each with a window, will be detailed with a section of this work, to give the appearance that each room has a unique identity and view of its own.

Detail from sketchbooks

Detail from sketchbooks

Detail form sketchbooks

Detail form sketchbooks

Detail: draft artwork in black & white

Detail: draft artwork in black & white

The artwork draft above shows the printed artwork as shades and layers of opaque white. The black areas will show as clear glass in the final works.

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Detail: draft artwork – Mock up of vinyl application on the glazing screen in one of the ward rooms.

There are 10 small one & two bed ward rooms arranged in two ward blocks within the new hospital by Nightingale Architects. The rooms are full of natural light and the interior colour schemes are muted and calm, with the odd spot of brighter colour, such as the chair. The artwork manifestation will respond to this scheme. The views through the windows are now partially obscured, providing a degree of privacy for the user, whilst also maintaining sufficient clear glass to allow natural light and changing weather conditions to be seen.

Detail: Draft Artwork

Detail: Draft Artwork

Detail: Iconography has been developed for the project using drawings of leaves and branching structures to create original & imagined plants. These are not botanical illustrations, rather, an impression of a landscape imagined.

Detail: Iconography has been developed for the project using drawings of leaves and branching structures to create original & imagined plants. These are not botanical illustrations, rather, an impression of a landscape imagined.

Detail: Iconography

Detail: Iconography

Detail: Iconography

Detail: Iconography

Detail: Draft artwork for 3 x Chrysanthemums - various textures and transparencies

Detail: Draft artwork for 3 x Chrysanthemums – various textures and transparencies

Detail: draft artwork

Detail: draft artwork

 

 

Bicester Community Hospital

Wednesday 1st October 2014

I have just been commissioned by Tom Cox, Artscape Project Manager for Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust to create artwork for the new Bicester Community Hospital.  The new hospital is being delivered by Kajima & Nightingale Architects alongside Mansell Construction – now part of Balfour Beatty Construction UK.

Bicester Community Hospital - Image by Kajima.co.uk

Bicester Community Hospital – Image by Kajima.co.uk

The new works will be digitally printed onto optically clear vinyl and applied to the glazed window & door screens of 10 ward rooms throughout the building.

Typical glazed integrated door & window screen for digitally printed artwork.

Typical glazed integrated door & window screen for digitally printed artwork.

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External view of ground floor elevation with glazed screens

External view of ground floor elevation with glazed screens

 

The work is being manufactured and installed to my designs by Guardian Window Film.

 

Day Treatment Unit, Cancer Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford

Tuesday 16th September 2014, Oxford Churchill Hospital, DTU, Cancer Centre I came up to Oxford today to review the installation of the wall-covering artwork along with VGL and the Trust Arts Coordinator, Ruth Charity. The DTU is an oncology & haematology day unit delivering chemotherapy & other cancer related treatments. The staff delivering this service are the most dedicated and hardworking group of people. How they have made time to collaborate and input into this project has been truly brilliant and a pertinent and sharp reminder that projects such as this succeed because of a positive buy in & contribution by staff and stakeholders alike. The work is created around a central core ‘island’ of offices and consulting rooms about which day treatment chemotherapy services are delivered. Most of the chairs and beds face onto this central island, meaning that most patients spend hours at a time over many weeks or even years staring at dull, blank walls, during treatment, rather than out of the windows behind them, which incidentally are too high to see through. A concept approach was developed to change this dull & monotonous view into a contemplative and softly illuminated abstract vista, interrupted by the suggested shadows of overhanging branches and foliage with dappled light breaking through.

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Corridor linking Chemotherapy Waiting Room to Oncology day treatment room

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Haematology treatment space

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Nurse Station

 

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Detail: Digitally printed vinyl wall covering

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Detail: Digitally printed vinyl wall covering

 

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Nurse Station

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Patient and visitor drinks station

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Corridor linking Oncology day treatment space with the Chemotherapy waiting room

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Haematology treatment space nurse station

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Detail: Patient & visitor drinks station

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Haematology treatment space nurse station

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Detail

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Detail with penguins

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Detail

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Oncology treatment space main nurse station

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Hand wash station

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Oncology nurse station – Detail of wall covering

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Haematology treatment space – Detail of wall covering

The Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury

Nightingale Architects have made available some new images of the project at The Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury. This particular image is of the large meeting room in the resource centre. The digitally printed artwork manufactured by Guardian is applied to the glazing screen. When the sun is strong, this creates an additional and fleeting, ephemeral extension of the artwork cast in shadow upon the floor and adjacent walls.

The digitally printed glazing artwork casts shadows on the adjacent walls.

The digitally printed glazing artwork casts shadows on the adjacent walls.

 

Detail of the Cafe and Waiting area of the resource centre. Image: Nightingale Architects

Detail of the Cafe and Waiting area of the resource centre. Image: Nightingale Architects

Christopher Tipping, the project artist standing next to a sample wall covering installation on the wards at The Whiteleaf Centre.  Image: Tom Cox

Christopher Tipping, the project artist standing next to a sample wall covering installation on the wards at The Whiteleaf Centre. Image: Tom Cox

Day Treatment Unit, Cancer Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford – Installation

Work began to prepare the unit for the installation in March this year. What appears to be a simple case of ‘wallpapering’ a space couldn’t be further from the truth within an environment such as this. Sensitivity to the treatments being carried out within the unit is paramount. The ongoing quality and appearance of the DTU must be considered, even during renovations and repair works. As this is a day treatment unit, weekend working for the specialist contractors from VGL is the only option. This means that the project has to be undertaken over a number of consecutive weekends, which appears to extend the project for longer than it really warrants.

 

The following images show the first area to be installed. These are not finished images as further works are due to make good the final positioning of furniture and fittings etc.

28th April 2014 The first panels are installed. This is a test area to ensure that the production and installation methods we have established, do in fact work on site!

28th April 2014 The first panels are installed. This is a test area to ensure that the production and installation methods we have established, do in fact work on site!

Many people make up the wider project team. They have to be consulted and become involved to enable the works to happen. This is time consuming stuff and I am so grateful to Ruth Charity, the Arts Co-ordinator for the Oxford University Hospital NHS Trust who has steered this project since the outset, through its fair share of stormy weather ! The staff particularly have been patient and encouraging throughout.

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DTU – test installation site…

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Day Treatment Unit, Cancer Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford. Detailed Design

We have been working alongside Carly Birkett, Account Manager at VGL, Reading, who has collaborated extensively on the design production, manufacture and installation planning for the project. By May 2013, we had small scale sample panels produced and installed within the unit in July 2013 for a number of weeks to gain feedback from staff and user groups. Following this period, the detailed design was revised and re-issued for comment.

Detail: sample panel design for production and installation within the unit to gain comment & feedback on the ideas and concept.

Detail: sample panel design for production and installation within the unit to gain comment & feedback on the ideas and concept.

 

The sample wall coverings were produced and installed for comment. They were also testing the process of installation and the potential hazards and pitfalls of preparing the unit  for the full installation.

7th July 2013 – The sample wall coverings were produced and installed for comment. They were also testing the process of installation and the potential hazards and pitfalls of preparing the unit for the full installation.

Sample installed for review within the unit circulation corridor.

7th July 2013 – Sample installed for review within the unit circulation corridor

One issue which arose was that within the confines of the the narrow corridor, the blurred form of the tree had a rather dizzying effect on some people as they tried to focus upon it. We alleviated the problem by layering another transparent image, which was very sharp, onto the surface, which gave the eye a clear object upon which to focus. Hopefully this has addressed the issue.

A number of trips were made to VGL's offices and production unit in Reading, where I worked alongside the production designer in reviewing and building the production artworks.

A number of trips were made to VGL’s offices and production unit in Reading, where I worked alongside the production designer in reviewing and building the production artworks.

Sample panels spread out for review and discussion at VGL

19th November 2013 and a trip to VGL in Reading. Sample panels spread out for review and discussion at VGL

Sample panels printed for review during design meetings at VGL in Reading

Sample panels printed for review during design meetings at VGL in Reading

Detailed plans of all the interior elevations were plotted by VGL. Carly Birkett made a number of site visit to take measures and ensure the right drawings were produced.

Detailed plans of all the interior elevations were plotted by VGL. Carly Birkett made a number of site visit to take measures and ensure the right drawings were produced.

19th November 2013, reviewing drafts on train home after meeting in Oxford.

19th November 2013, reviewing drafts on train home after meeting in Oxford.

19th `november 2013. Making notes on draft designs

19th `november 2013. Making notes on draft designs

2013-11-19 14.22.38 The three following images are the set of final & approved pdf’s circulated for formal approval. These are the designs which went into production and printing

Final production design for Clinical Preparation Pod area.

Final production design for Clinical Preparation Pod area.

Detailed production design for the Nurse Office Pod area.

Detailed production design for the Nurse Office Pod area.

Final production design for the Storage / Counselling area.

Final production design for the Storage / Counselling area.

Detail: Final artwork

Detail: Final artwork

Detail: Final Artwork

Detail: Final Artwork

Detail: Final Design

Detail: Final Design

These are the individual elevations in linear form which make up the interior 'island' or glade within the unit. Only small sections of the walls can be seen at any one time. The elevations will be interrupted by doors and direction changes etc.

Detail: A partial view of  the individual elevations in linear form which make up the interior ‘island’ or glade within the unit. Only small sections of the walls can be seen at any one time. The elevations will be interrupted by doors and direction changes etc.

The final designs were then sampled and full scale sections delivered to the Trust for review and comment.  As you can see from the following images, the panels were quite a handful to manage and manoeuvre.

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5th December 2013 & a trip to Oxford to review the  new samples. Carly Birkett, Accounts Manager for VGL and Ruth Charity, Arts Coordinator for Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, hold up the sample panel for staff and me to view.

5th December 2013 DTU, Cancer Centre, Oxford

On 5th December 2013, we finally approved the samples panels produced from the detailed production designs. From here on it was all go to set a schedule for print, manufacture and installation.

Day Treatment Unit, Cancer Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford. Concept & Draft Design

This is an introduction to the project – ‘Landscape: bringing the outside in’

This is a full scale sample panel for an area of bespoke wall covering. VGL produced many such sample for us to approve and have been incredibly understanding and helpful in bringing the project to fruition. Ruth Charity, Arts Co-ordinator is on the right of this image & Carly Birkett, Account Manager for VGLis on the left.

This is a full scale sample panel for an area of bespoke wall covering. VGL produced many such sample for us to approve and have been incredibly understanding and helpful in bringing the project to fruition. Ruth Charity, Arts Co-ordinator is on the right of this image & Carly Birkett, Account Manager for VGLis on the left.

This arts project was commissioned in April 2012 for the Cancer & Haematology Day Treatment Unit, aka DTU, at Churchill Hospital, Oxford.  Ruth Charity, the Arts Coordinator for Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust has been instrumental in delivering the arts strategy. The Cancer Centre opened in March 2009 & was delivered by the Churchill Construction Consortium and designed by Steffian Bradley Architects.

The art project is currently in production and installation is starting on site this coming weekend.

The project brief described the unit as: “Between 70 -90 patients/day attend the Day Treatment Unit requiring treatment for varying malignancies and benign blood disorders. The treatment regimens (e.g. chemotherapy / blood transfusions) can be complex & lengthy, taking anything from 30 minutes to several hours, with some patients attending twice a week and others once every three weeks. The Day Treatment Unit consists of one long horseshoe-shaped room,accommodating 12 beds & 30 chairs. Currently there is little artwork on the walls and there is little of interest for patients to view. The windows are very high so there is no opportunity for patients to look out and thus no sense of what the weather is like or even what season it is. As a space, which patients visit on a regular basis, it offers little to lift the tedium of repeat visits”. 

Day Treatment Unit, Nurse Station. The patients within the unit are treated in beds or chairs set out around the perimeter of the rooms, facing into the centre of the room with any windows and natural light behind them. This is a typical view of the space.

Day Treatment Unit, Nurse Station. The patients within the unit are treated in beds or chairs set out around the perimeter of the rooms, facing into the centre of the room with any windows and natural light behind them. This is a typical view of the space.

Day Treatment Unit. All the treatment areas face onto a central 'island' of nurse stations and clinical rooms and service corridors, which make for a rather un-relieving view. Some patients are here for up to 4 or 5 hours at a time.

Day Treatment Unit. All the treatment areas face onto a central ‘island’ of nurse stations and clinical rooms and service corridors, which make for a rather un-relieving view. Some patients are here for up to 4 or 5 hours at a time.

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Day Treatment Unit, view from treatment areas with beds and chairs.

Day Treatment Unit, view from treatment areas with beds and chairs.

Day Treatment Unit.

Day Treatment Unit showing treatment chairs facing away from the windows. Although the nurse stations benefit from the natural light which comes in from a series of small, high windows, it does appear to diminish the experience of patients within the unit.

Day Treatment Unit Corridor

Day Treatment Unit Corridor

The aims of the project were :

to create a more welcoming, positive and inviting feel to the Chemotherapy suite;

to create new work that will provide some distraction for patients undergoing treatment;

to create new work that responds to the architecture and interior design of the space and unifies the space;

to create new work that is created with sensitivity to patients and those working in and visiting the department;

to create work that responds to the art programme theme of landscape: bringing the outside in;

to create work that is easy to clean, meets infection control standards and requires little or no maintenance

'Bringing the landscape in...;, The concept was driven by the woodland and planting which surrounded the Cancer Centre, very little of which could be viewed from within the unit. The sky was predominant as the windows are so high. Blue sky, clouds, rain, grey, bright, dull, overcast - all conditions which influenced our discussions and responses to the site.

‘Bringing the landscape in…;, The concept was driven by the woodland and planting which surrounded the Cancer Centre, very little of which could be viewed from within the unit. The sky was predominant as the windows are so high. Blue sky, clouds, rain, grey, bright, dull, overcast – all conditions which influenced our discussions and responses to the site.

Blue sky with clouds...

Blue sky with clouds…

Our approach had to be considerate of and sensitive to the treatments being delivered here and the wellbeing of patients. Scale and distance form the walls was a critical factor. We have to be extremely careful about colour or figurative detail and scale which could have a negative influence on patients.  The more muted and soft views on an early misty morning image taken in a local park began to appear more condusive to setting the stage for our intervention.

Our approach had to be considerate of and sensitive to the treatments being delivered here and the wellbeing of patients. Scale and distance  of patients from the walls  opposite was a critical factor. We had to be extremely careful about colour & figurative detail and scale which could have a negative influence  and impact on patients. The more muted and soft views on an early misty morning image taken in a local park began to appear conducive to setting the stage for our intervention.

'Landscape: bringing the outside in..."

‘Landscape: bringing the outside in…”

Tree shadows on a concrete wall are both sharply focussed or softly blurred depending on the distance of the tree from the wall.

Tree shadows on a concrete wall are both sharply focussed or softly blurred depending on the distance of the tree from the wall.

The shadows of trees here combine with the building onto which they are bast to create an abstract backdrop.

The shadows of trees here combine with the building onto which they are bast to create an abstract backdrop.

I have worked at the Cancer Centre previously within the adjacent Chemotherapy Waiting Room, where a large triptych – an architectural glass artwork, originally commissioned for the old Oncology Unit by GBS Architects, had been re-sited successfully as a screen between the patient waiting room and clinical offices and corridor. This work was further enhanced by digitally printed optically clear vinyl installed on all interior glazing panels within the waiting area by VGL Ltd. I will post an archive review of this project in due course under the heading ‘Chemotherapy Waiting Room’. 

The DTU project was initiated with a two day residency during which I talked to staff and engaged with patients. The delivery of treatments make this a very sensitive place to observe and great care was taken to be as unobtrusive as possible. There has been an ongoing process of engagement & he staff have been a continual joy to work alongside. Their collective upbeat and supportive collaboration has made this project particularly special for me. The key staff, who smoothed the progress of the project throughout have been: Eliz Flanagan – Lead Chemotherapy Nurse, Jane Skelly – Chemotherapy Specialist Nurse and Moira Cunningham – Sister, Oncology and Haematology Outpatients. Other members of the Champions Group who informed my work & engagement within the department are: Claire Tasker – supporter, Julie Bourchier – former patient & Liz Creak – former patient.

Initially I produced a to-scale model of the interior ‘island’, a cluster of rooms around which I was to base the installation. The idea was to create an interior landscape, or vista which almost felt as though the trees and plants were overhanging the space, creating an abstract misty glade to look into.

Plan drawing of the DTU. The pink area outlined in red shows the 'island', a cluster of rooms at the centre of the unit around which the circulation flows. The green line shows the perimeter of the unit and the position of  the treatment chairs and beds all aligned to face the 'island'.

Plan drawing of the DTU. The pink area outlined in red shows the ‘island’, a cluster of rooms at the centre of the unit around which the circulation flows. The green line shows the perimeter of the unit and the position of the treatment chairs and beds all aligned to face the ‘island’.

This is a scale model of the interior 'island' and a concept surface design to illustrate the approach.

This is a scale model of the interior ‘island’ and a concept surface design to illustrate the approach.

Research image - overhanging tree...

Research image – overhanging tree…

Scale model investigating the concept and approach.

Scale model investigating the concept and approach.

Draft for the 'island' elevations.

Draft for the ‘island’ elevations.

Draft artwork for the Beverage Bay wall elevation

Draft artwork for the Beverage Bay wall elevation

Draft wall elevation

Draft wall elevation

Draft Wall Elevation

Draft Wall Elevation

 

We have been working alongside Carly Birkett, Account Manager at VGL, Reading who have collaborated on the design production, manufacture and installation planning for the project. We have had small scale sample panels produced and installed within the unit for a number of weeks to gain feedback from staff and user groups. Following this period, the detailed design was revised and re-issued for comment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury

Today I received some new images of the Whiteleaf Centre and the interior and am posting them here by kind permission of Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust.

The core members of the project team with whom I collaborated on the project are:

Tom Cox – Project Manager, Artscape, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Mental Health Division

Mark Bateman – Capital Development Manager, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust

Britta MacDonald – Senior Assertive Outreach Worker, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust

Michelle Harding – Head of Adult Acute Pathway, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust  

Neil Flint – Commercial Services Manager, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust

Whiteleaf Centre, Nightingale Associate Architects, Front Elevation with some glazing artwork visible on the right hand side.

Whiteleaf Centre, Kier and Nightingale Associate Architects for Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust.  Front Elevation with some glazing artwork visible on the right hand side.

Whiteleaf  Centre, Main Reception. Some glazing artwork can be seen on the doors and glazing to the external courtyard to the centre of the image.

Whiteleaf Centre, Main Reception. Some glazing artwork can be seen on the doors and glazing to the external courtyard to the centre of the image.

Ward Hub Interior - showing the ward identity artwork. Each of the 4 wards has a colour coded artwork to assist in creating a unique identity for each area.

Ward Hub Interior – showing the ward identity artwork. Each of the 4 wards has a colour coded artwork to assist in creating a unique identity for each area.

Detail of Ward Hub artworks.

Detail of Ward Hub artworks.

The Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury. Front entrance elevation. The small sapling tree on the green roundabout in the foreground is a specimen tree planted to create a focal point.  The tree is a Variegated Tulip Tree and was decided upon in collaboration with the project Landscape Architect, Robyn Butcher of Terra Firma Consultancy.

The Whiteleaf Centre, Aylesbury. Front entrance elevation. The small sapling tree on the green roundabout in the foreground is a specimen tree planted to create a focal point. The tree is a Variegated Tulip Tree and was decided upon in collaboration with the project Landscape Architect, Robyn Butcher of Terra Firma Consultancy.

70th Anniversary Screen, Central Concourse, Jubilee Building, Musgrove Park Hospital

Architen Landrell, who manufactured and installed the tensile screen, sent me their project images this week. Some of these I hadn’t seen before, so  am now posting for the first time.

One side up !

One side up !

Looking into the central void space between columns.

Looking into the central void space between columns.

One side of the double sided screen is attached -

One side of the double sided screen is attached –

Digitally printed fabric in process of installation and attaching to frame.

Digitally printed fabric in process of installation and attaching to frame.

They show the fabric installation in progress and the steel frame attached the columns in the Central Concourse. The concept for the work was determined by the need for the fabric to create a privacy screen between the main thoroughfare and hub of the Central Concourse & the clinical corridor which ran adjacent to it, without compromising the architectural space or blocking light. GEDC0208_1.0 - (602627)_Extra Large - (762759)

The tensile fabric is translucent and the supporting structure and columns can be seen through it.

The tensile fabric is translucent and the supporting steel frame structure and architectural columns can be seen through it.

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Detail: Shadow 'Cross' & dynamic flow of archive narrative .

Detail: Shadow ‘Cross’ & dynamic flow of archive narrative .

Text was used as both a textural device and a narrative with which to lead the viewer through the work. Text came from two primary sources. The Hospital provided a great archive through which to trawl. A good deal of this was in the form of written accounts of service by retired staff. The other source was form an ex US Servicemen, Sidney A. Smith MD, who had served as a doctor at Musgrove Park during WWII. His book, A History of Musgrove Military Hospital During World War II and The 67th General Hospital, was a fascinating account of the early years and origins of the Hospital. Sidney Smith had very kindly allowed me access to his photographs & images  during my time working a lead artist at Musgrove Park. Some of this text is below:   “A Royal Visit by H.M Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother on Thursday, 19th November 1959, was a great occasion for Taunton. The town was gaily decorated, church bells pealed, and, despite the dismal weather forecast, the spirit of the people was at its brightest. Following the reception at the Station, H.M. Queen Elizabeth left for the Musgrove Park Branch of the Taunton & Somerset Hospital, where on arrival, she was presented with a posy of orchids, pink rosebuds and lilies of the valley”.  “The 67th General Hospital adopted a banner, which bore images of a Pine tree and a cactus plant to symbolize the Maine contingent of doctors and nurses joined with the enlisted men who were mostly from Texas and Oklahoma”.  “We used to have Sunflower competitions at the back of x-ray. Seeds would be planted and ingenious methods of support would be rigged, much to the amusement of both staff and patients”.   “From the beginning of my time here we had the National Uniform, classic navy blue for the Sisters and light blue for the Staff Nurses and of course you had your belt, which kept many a waistline under control. We were quick to abandon the paper hats, although the sisters were more reluctant to lose their frilly hats and sleeves. Everyone knew who you were because of the uniform you wore”. 

The frame as seen from level one.

The frame as seen from level one.

The tensile work fully installed. The right hand side of the Central Concourse will become a retail area with units running the same length as the screen opposite.

The tensile work fully installed, as seen from the Level 1 balcony. The right hand side of the Central Concourse will become a retail area with units running the same length as the screen opposite. They are just out of shot in this image.

The Central Concourse space has a fantastic timber ceiling detail by Project Architects BDP. GEDC0236_1.0 - (602653)_Extra Large - (762779)