Tag Archives: Art in Healthcare

Precious Objects

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Some years ago a long standing family friend  and close friend of my Dad was being treated for cancer. He and his wife had often been to Elgol on the shores of Lock Skavaig on the Isle of Skye. They loved this place. I too had been there and as is the case – and now slightly frowned upon – I picked up some stones from a stream bed. The stones were small, but smooth & beautifully polished to a honed satin finish by the action of water. They could be held in the hand and moved around. The feeling of them was somehow special and resonant. I still have them now, wrapped in a cloth bag for fear of damaging them. I sent one of these stones to Dad’s friend. In doing that I think we had a non verbal conversation at distance about place and memories. I like to think it was re-assuring for both of us.

I have always picked up stones. They represent something unique about place, time and experience. Geology is fascinating.

I live by the sea in Ramsgate on the Kent Coast. I walk on the beach most days. I have found many sea urchin fossils. Each has a unique story. Each stone can still trigger memories of where and when it was found, what the weather was like…was the tide in or out.

I have created work for several projects with Cancer treatment centres at a number of Hospitals, including Churchill Hospital Cancer Centre, Oxford and a Macmillan Cancer unit for Tameside General Hospital. At Tameside Hospital and found my inspiration on a 12 mile walk entitled “Journeys through the Landscapes of Tameside” – this walk eventually became the brief for the project.

Stewart Ramsden, my walking partner who compiled the walk, had also been a cancer patient at the hospital and was part of our project’s champion group. Our route was eventually described by an eccentric figure of eight. Wild Bank and Hollingworthall Moor from Godley – a 12 mile walk through town, suburb, farmland and moorland.

The following words were made from my notes on the day:

This is a walk

A meander, a physical experience or just maybe a day-dream

A walk is more often along a path

The path or footpath changes in colour, texture and topography –

but there is always a remembered route to follow or a map to guide you

or maybe a venture to somewhere new

There is a constancy in moving forward

Things seen on a walk are half experienced and half remembered

A vivid green hedge

A tyre track

A discarded toy

A cloud which looks like a tree, a stream which looks like silver, a flash of colour

Horizon merges with sky

This is a landscape with no fixed perspective

Sky reflected in water

A small stone becomes a boulder

An object picked up and carried in the hand along the way

Track marks in fields are gestural and dynamic

Distant buildings become a child’s building blocks

 The layersPatterns in brickwork

 

Our project for the new Radiotherapy Unit at Dorset Hospital was similarly inspired by a walk along the Jurassic Coast I made ten years ago. I was hoping to find myself an ammonite to take home. I didn’t find any, but I saw many encased in rock by the shore. I saw the Blue Lias beds that contain giant plesiosaur fossils. The layers are like drawers in time. Each opening to another world and perhaps another wonder. I was also allowed free time to spend in the Dorset Museum Archives amongst boxes and drawers and piles of specimen stones and fossils. The way these objects were carefully curated and stored – often in intricate patterns and collections of similar sizes and or type. was inspiring and reminded me of my collections at home and of how precious they are to me.  The artwork has grown out of this fascination. The stones I have created are imaginary in colour and pattern, although informed by nature. They are perhaps stones I would like to find. Stones I would hold in my imagination to remind me of journeys I have made and places I have been.

We have now had the approval and sign off on the artwork proposals following a recent meeting with key Staff and stakeholders this week. The deadline is looming. The new building opens on 12th December. The work has to be manufactured and installed before this date.

Draft Artworks for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

To create the digital work each element requires up to 3 copies of each shape. One blank, one black & white and one in colour. The black & white originals are a mix of hand drawn motifs and textures, which are then scanned and worked on in Photoshop. I create a series of related shapes and masks, which I can then combine with larger patterns, often in repeat.Colours are added at this stage. I will often scan objects such as found paper or leaves and work on them digitally. I take too many images in the street, of shapes of water on the pavement – or reflections in windows – or a small plant growing in a crack in the ground or on a wall. All these can trigger an idea for a pattern or story.

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

First Floor Reception Artwork for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Golden yellow Ginkgo sapling motif for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

First Floor Non Clinical Staff Room. Artwork for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Agate Stone colour motif for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Window 101 Artwork for Glazing Vinyl at Dorset County Hospital new Radiotherapy Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Window 102 Artwork for Glazing Vinyl at Dorset County Hospital new Radiotherapy Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

 

Window 103 Artwork for Glazing Vinyl at Dorset County Hospital new Radiotherapy Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Window 104 Artwork for Glazing Vinyl at Dorset County Hospital new Radiotherapy Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Draft Artwork & Motifs for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Window 105 Artwork for Glazing Vinyl at Dorset County Hospital new Radiotherapy Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

Window 106 Artwork for Glazing Vinyl at Dorset County Hospital new Radiotherapy Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

Autumnal sapling tree motif for Glazing Vinyl Dorset County Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Hydrotherapy Pool North Screen in production at Proto Studios

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Work is now in progress at the brilliant Proto Glass Studios on the first stage of screen printing ceramic colour for of the NORTH SCREEN. We are collaborating with Proto Studios, specialist Architectural Glass Decorators on the production of 46sqm of screen printed, sandblasted & etched architectural glass screens for the new Hydrotherapy Pool & Therapies Unit for the RUH and RNHRD in Bath commissioned by Art at the Heart. The artwork is presented as an abstracted landscape running over both the North & the East Screens of the Pool Room – a way of encapsulating all disparate elements that have inspired my work into something engaging for the viewer, which will changes throughout the day in response to levels of daylight and direct sun.

Both the RUH & RNHRD Hospital sites were originally set in, and adjacent to open fields and expansive views of countryside. Easy to imagine then how beneficial this must have been to those patients and staff who experienced this.

It is now commonly understood that exposure to natural spaces, planting and nature within medical and healing environments is of great benefit and assists in the recovery and positive experience of patients and staff alike .

This landscape is populated with recognisable motifs, such as flowers, deer and trees, woven together with abstracted forms and simple repeating patterns. Local landmarks such as Kelston Round Hill also feature, as do references to the architectural decoration and built heritage of The Min and its archaic Roman Mosaics. However, the most visible motif perhaps is water, and more explicitly, the gestural movement of water as shaped by those taking treatment in the Hydrotherapy Pool. A shape made in water informed by the movement of a hand or leg. Abstractions of steam or mist appear to hover in this landscape. Water is contained within a bowl or pool. An elegant but dynamic abstract splash of water drifts across the whole of the East Screen. The connection to hot springs and flowing waters has shaped Bath into the World Heritage Site we see today.

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Production at Proto Studios. Image: Christopher Tipping

Decoration for the Hydrotherapy Pool Glazing …hello deer !

I imagined an abstracted landscape as a positive  way of encapsulating all that has inspired my commission for the Hydrotherapy Pool glazed screens. (There are approximately 46sqm of glass combined in both screens).

Both Hospital sites were originally set in and adjacent to open fields and expansive views of countryside. Easy to imagine then how beneficial this must have been to those patients and staff who experienced this.

It is now commonly understood that exposure to natural spaces, planting and nature within medical and healing environments is of great benefit and assists in the recovery and positive experience of patients and staff alike.

Deer with Roman pattern. Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

This glass landscape is populated with recognisable motifs, such as flowers, deer and trees, woven together with abstract forms and repeating patterns. Local landmarks such as Kelston Round Hill also feature, as do references to the architectural decoration and built heritage of The Min and its archaic Roman Mosaics. However, the most visible motif perhaps is water, and more explicitly, the gestural movement of water as shaped by those taking treatment in the Hydrotherapy Pool. A shape made in water informed by the movement of a hand or leg. Abstractions of steam or mist appear to hover in this landscape. Water is contained within a bowl or pool. An elegant but dynamic abstract splash of water drifts across the whole of the East Screen. The connection to hot springs and flowing waters has shaped Bath into the World Heritage Site we see today.

I have been so impressed with the positivity and care of the medical staff delivering these services, I wanted to evoke this caring nature with visual clues within the work, which may express this. Growing flowers and creating gardens is a nurturing vocation. Water is an elemental part of this.  Historically, The Min was built upon the grounds of the first Theatre in Bath, and the later extension built upon the formal gardens of Rectory House. Adjacent to the ChapeI at the rear of The Min is a small but lovely garden. Also in Bath, Gibbes Garden was a 15th Century apothecary garden growing medicinal herbs.

Combe Park had formerly been the site of the Bath War Hospital built in 1916 to provide beds and medical services for WW1 Casualties. There was a small pond and a stream ran nearby. Patients and staff were encouraged to grow and maintain flower gardens & were rewarded with prizes.

I was offered a session at the Hydrotherapy Pool at The Min as a way of understanding a little more about the impact of water as a treatment. I am not a patient – I cannot experience this as many do on a daily basis, not I am I in the process of healing or tempering acute conditions. Patients vary from those with lifelong conditions, such as Ankylosing spondylitis and others suffering from chronic pain, to physiotherapy in the pool following operations or broken limbs.  All I can aim for is to add to the interior space with something visually interesting / beautiful / stimulating to this brand-new environment, which makes the experience for both staff and patients a pleasant and perhaps an intriguing one.

The following images make up the final draft artwork approved for production by the RUH. The Magenta/Pink colour is used to indicate clear/fully transparent glazing with no artwork. White represents sandblasting and / or Ceramic Etch techniques. All other colour is created using Screen-printed Ceramic Colour fired onto the glass. The artwork is applied to the two inner faces of a double glazed sealed unit. There is a subtle overlaying of motifs, which means that the artwork is slightly different as seen from the interior, than the exterior. These drafts are created initially via hand drawing and assembled and finished in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Final Master Draft for the North and East Glazed Screens. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Research Images developing colour & patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen detail 4. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen detail 3. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Iris drawing. Research drawings developing motifs and patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the East Glazed Screen detail 2. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Donkey with pattern. Research Images developing motifs & patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Orange. Research Images developing motifs, patterns & colours from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the North Glazed Screen detail 1. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the North Glazed Screen detail 2. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Final Master Draft for the North Glazed Screen detail 3. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft 16 Foil shape with Foxgloves. Research drawings developing motifs & patterns from research at the RNHRD, including The Min Chapel. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Hydrotherapy Pool, Royal United Hospital, Bath – new Therapies Centre

Draft Artwork: Interior with architectural glazed screens – Christopher Tipping

External draft artwork detail of the Hydrotherapy Pool. Image: Christopher Tipping

I was commissioned by Art at the Heart of the RUH in December 2017 to create artwork in response to the architectural glazing in the Hydrotherapy Pool room at the new Therapies Centre for the Royal United Hospital, Bath. These architectural glass panels are floor to ceiling glazed apertures with a combined 46.40 sq m of glass. I am working in collaboration with PROTO GLASS STUDIOS, Architectural Glass Decorators.

The project is being delivered by Kier Construction Ltd with Architects IBI Group

We have also been engaged with a large group of stakeholders, including staff and service users, some of whom have been are lifelong patients at the RNHRD & RUH. This is an ongoing process and we are taking everyone on the journey with us.

‘FLOW’

“Flow is active. It is not just the water, but it is the way our muscles are warmed and released, allowing blood to flow more freely. It is the freedom from stiffness of joints, when even a centimetre gained is a big triumph. It is active horizontally and not vertically. My spine is fully arthrosed and I cannot turn my head. This is a fundamental problem for AS patients and one of the big exercises in the pool and the gym is trying to turn and look over your shoulder without moving your body. That is flow. It is horizontal”. George Odam RNHRD Lifelong Patient with Ankylosing spondylitis (AS), speaking about his personal journey and experience of hydrotherapy treatment in 2017.

The Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (RNHRD) and The Brownsword Therapies Centre (BTC)

The new RNHRD and BTC will be built close to the main entrance of the Royal United Hospital or RUH; it will be an outpatient centre providing treatment, care and education for patients to recover from episodes of illness or injury, or to manage their long-term condition. The new building will house many of the services currently located at the RNHRD (also known as The Mineral Hospital/ The Min) and the existing RUH therapies and pain management services located in RUH North, under one roof. The Centre will create a centralised and integrated space for staff to work collaboratively, delivering a holistic and patient-centred approach to care.

Old Hydrotherapy Pool, RUH Bath. Image: Christopher Tipping

Hydrotherapy Pool at The Royal Mineral Water Hospital, RNHRD, Bath, 2018. Image:Christopher Tipping

Rubber Ducks at the Hydrotherapy Pool at The Royal Mineral Water Hospital, RNHRD, Bath, 2018. Image: Christopher Tipping

Objects at the Hydrotherapy Pool at The Royal Mineral Water Hospital, RNHRD, Bath, 2018. Image: Christopher Tipping

Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath. Image: Christopher Tipping

Pediment of the Royal Mineral Water Hospital, Bath, aka The Min 2018. Image: Christopher Tipping

The Min, as the RNHRD is affectionately known, has a small Medical Museum situated in the Old Chapel.  It is a fascinating collection and curated and managed by a small group of dedicated and enthusiastic people, who allowed me access to the photographic Archives. This was very much appreciated.

‘In 2012 the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases [The Mineral Hospital] opened a small museum to showcase their collection. Now, with the imminent closure of the hospital in the centre of Bath, our museum has been granted custody of the Collection of the Min, which includes records dating back to the 1740s, artefacts, the paintings and other pieces of art from around the Hospital, memorabilia, and photographs relating to rheumatology, medicine and pharmacy’

A Hubbard Tank was used for entire body treatments in Hydrotherapy. Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

Patient taking a Nauheim effervescent bath, date unknown – Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

Vichy spray massage treatment. Date unknown – Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

Brass identity medallions worn by patients in the 18th Century. Image: Copyright & by kind permission of Bath Medical Museum, RNHRD

 

 

Dorset County Hospital – the new Cancer Unit Glazing Artwork

Image: Draft artwork with re-imagined stones by Christopher Tipping 2018

I have been commissioned to create artwork to be digitally printed onto optically clear vinyl for the external glazing of the new Cancer Unit at Dorset County Hospital. Dorset’s pioneering new cancer unit is under construction and is due to be delivered in 2018. It is being built and operated jointly by Poole and Dorset HospitalsMy approach has been framed by a research trip I made back in June 2008 to the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site and to Dorchester Museums Archive Collections and the Natural History Museum in London.

Image: Christopher Tipping- Jurassic Coast Dorset 2008

Image: Christopher Tipping- Display Box of Microfossils, Dorset County Museum 2008

Image: Found objects and natural abstractions for Dorset County Hospital Cancer Unit by Christopher Tipping

Ten years ago I created artwork for wayfinding and inlaid bespoke floor coverings for the corridors of the main hospital buildings and also for Maiden Castle House, which provides Psychiatric Services for the Trust. This original body of work, completed in 2010 was considered a resonant starting point for this new project in 2018 and has been instrumental in underpinning the artwork created for the Cancer Unit.

Alex Coulter, former Arts Manager, Arts in Hospital writing in 2008 said –

‘The artist, Chris Tipping, researched and recorded geological structures, fossils and land forms along the Jurassic coast as the basis for his designs. He made drawings on the coast and in Dorset County Museum’s collections and talked to geologists based at Southampton University to help inform his ideas.  Chris was interested in the idea that the floors in the hospital could be interpreted as the layers or strata of the coast with fossil like patterns embedded in them and fragments and elements emerging where different layers meet. They are inlaid into the floor at key areas such as lift thresholds and at the top of staircases to help with wayfinding while smaller elements break up long expanses of corridor. It was Chris’s idea to curve the edges of the flooring and to reveal sections of designs rather as you might see a fragment in the cliff. The technology used is sophisticated with laser cutting creating elements which fit together with no need for sealant in-between. His designs enliven what would otherwise be vast expanses of plain flooring and contribute to making the hospital environment more stimulating and appealing for patients – a healing environment’.

 

The following text was taken from the 2018 project brief by Alex Murdin, Arts Manager, Arts in Hospital, at Dorset County Hospital.

‘Initial consultation with patients and staff suggested that the theme of the Cancer Unit artworks should evolve around nature and light, “Letting in the Light”. Medical and psychological evidence is strong that natural images, textures, patterns and light are all beneficial for wellbeing and recovery . Contact with Nature has been reported to have psychological benefits by reducing stress, improving attention, by having a positive effect on mental restoration, and by coping with attention deficits.

Natural light is important to healing and wellbeing and patients with views of open spaces get better faster. As the views from the new Cancer Unit will be limited to other hospital buildings and urban Dorchester, art can provide an alternative view for patients through translucent imagery of landscape and natural forms on windows. The window vinyls must in any case screen off views of the interior from outside by passers-by and occupiers of adjacent buildings, as necessary for patient’s actual and perceived privacy and confidentiality without the need for blinds and the accompanying loss of light’.

Dorset’s pioneering new cancer unit is under construction and due to be delivered in 2018 is being built and operated jointly by Poole and Dorset Hospitals. It will deliver world class health care for our local communities. The project will develop cancer facilities for patients all across Dorset and bring radiotherapy services to Dorchester for the first time. The new facilities will be life-changing, particularly for people who have previously had to travel long distances for radiotherapy services in Poole.

The unit will serve people of all ages, who have been diagnosed with cancer as well as their families. Patients who use this service are likely to be distressed and for some people, they may be living with a terminal diagnosis. The unit will be home to new linear accelerators (LINAC) – the device most commonly used for external beam radiation treatments for patients with cancer. It will be a multi-functional space offering life changing radiotherapy, consulting rooms and counselling rooms. The unit will also be used by support groups. The unit is being funded Dorset County Hospital Charity, Dorset County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (DCHFT), Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and with a major legacy from the photographer Robert White, a local man who died from cancer in 2015′. 

Image: Draft Artwork for Dorset County Hospital Cancer Unit by Christopher Tipping

Image: Draft Artwork – Found & re-imagined stones for Dorset County Hospital Cancer Unit by Christopher Tipping

Image: Draft artwork for Dorset County Hospital Cancer Unit by Christopher Tipping

 

 

A different view …

Some brilliant new images of my project for the new Macmillan Unit at Tameside & Glossop Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust  have come to light. It is always refreshing to see how others see your work & the space it was created for. In this instance I was very kindly given permission by Mike Hearle, European Digital Marketing Manager for Construction Specialties – to use images from their website. Construction Specialities supplied and installed the solid timber handrails running through the unit.  Take a look …the artwork was digitally printed and installed by VGL. The project was delivered by IBI Group Architects and Willis Newson, the UK’s leading arts and health consultancy.

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit. Artwork by Christopher Tipping. Image by kind permission of Construction Specialities

Littlemore Mental Health Centre – Detailed Design

Thursday 4th May 2017 – 

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft artwork awaiting approval to go into production – we are working with our client team to review / comment and approve in the next few days so we can meet our install schedule.

 

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

At this stage I set all the imagery against a black background – which actually indicates glazing with no printing – just clear glass.

This work will be digitally printed onto optically clear vinyl. The process allows for a layer of colour, followed by a layer of white and finally another layer of colour. The artwork can be read equally from both viewing sides – inside or outside the building. The production level artwork files, sampling and final digital printing and installation is done by my long-time collaborators, Vinyl Graphics Ltd.

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Various degrees of opacity and transparency are designed into the artwork. As a rule this is worked out via single colour files – in this case magenta – which clearly indicate degrees of opacity.

Draft Magenta Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Magenta Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Magenta Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork: Littlemore Mental Health Centre. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Littlemore Mental Health Centre, Oxford

Project Update – 20th April 2017 

Mental Health Services at Littlemore Mental Health Centre, are directed and managed by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust .

This arts in health project was commissioned for Wenric Ward , which provides Low Secure Adult Services  – by Tom Cox of Artscape and the Staff of Wenric Ward.

Information about the history of the earlier Littlemore Hospital in Oxford can be accessed via this link to the Oxfordshire Health Archives  and to the accompanying site about County Asylums 

Tom worked alongside Occupational Therapists Helen Keay (Senior OT) and Holly Williams, in collaborating with patients, to undertake a series of workshops centred around drawing and mark making. I was subsequently provided with access to these drawings as inspiration for the artwork, using where possible, drawing motifs, textures and colours which formed part of the outcome from the creative sessions.

The project site is created within the internal circulation space of the Ward, centred around a small external courtyard. Artwork will be digitally printed onto optically clear vinyl and applied to the glazing, which provides views into the courtyard. The artwork has been commissioned to be applied on three sides of the courtyard glazing taking in the Circulation Corridor, Lounge and Multi-Faith Room, animating the space, introducing colour and detail and to visually engage patients and staff.

 

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft Artwork for Wenric Ward, Littlemore Mental Health Unit, Oxford. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit – Part 2

The Chemotherapy Treatment Room. During my last visit to site on 13th March 2017 – I was really interested to see how the creative concept for the project had been applied in the Chemotherapy Treatment Room – a state of the art, 6 chair Chemotherapy Suite.

The artwork was to be applied to the adjustable privacy screens adjacent to each chair. The work forms a continuous landscape, divided into 6 sections, which will be continually re-arranged to present new combinations as the screens are used throughout the day.

These screens were manufactured and installed by Kwickscreen. 

The Christie Hospital has also launched a 3 day a week chemotherapy service at the new £1.8m Macmillan Unit.

Tameside Macmillan Unit.  Willis Newson. IBI Group Architects. John Turner Construction Group

 

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Chemotherapy Suite at the New Macmillan Unit, showing artwork applied to the privacy screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

Tameside Hospital New Macmillan Unit – Part 1

I made my last visit to site on 13th March 2017 – to see the artworks fully installed. The interiors throughout the new unit are all completed, fully furnished and operational and the first clinics were to be held the very next day. Tameside Macmillan Unit  Willis Newson

No more words – only images –

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit at Tameside Hospital – Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior detail of the New Macmillan Unit, showing the main corridor bespoke wallcovering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering & timber handrail. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering & solid timber handrail. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering & solid timber handrail. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the main corridor bespoke wall covering as seen through the laminated glazed screens. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the New Macmillan Unit, showing a detail of the external glazing artworks. Project Artist: Christopher Tipping