Tag Archives: Healthcare Arts

Harrison Park, Hall Road, Hull – Part 2

Harrison Park, Hull – Artwork Development

Each element used in the design starts as an ink sketch or line drawing. These are often drawn over-sized and larger than they will appear in the artwork to scale. The individual images are then scanned and saved as high res. jpegs allowing me to import into Photoshop.

 

Concept development – drawings of plants for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Double Dyer – drawings of plants for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Potmus Lucens drawing for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Birds Foot Trefoil drawings for Harrison Park, Extra Care Facility, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

Artwork Development – Individual motifs and vectors used in the artwork for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Abstract Field Pattern Motifs used as backgrounds in the glazing vinyl artworks for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Abstract Field Pattern Motifs used as backgrounds in the glazing vinyl artworks for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

 

The following drafts were approved and signed off by the client team to develop into detailed design for production.

 

Early draft for complete elevation of glazing vinyl artworks for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Early draft for Restaurant glazing vinyl elevation for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Early draft for Restaurant glazing vinyl elevation for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Early draft for the Communal Lounge glazing vinyl elevation for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft for whole elevation glazing vinyl for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

In the above draft artwork the optically clear vinyl, with no print colour is shown as black. This would appear as fully transparent glazing. The artwork presents various colour & opacity values, utilising print white techniques to great effect. VGL have been excellent and creative collaborators on this project.

Below is a draft production file from VGL which shows – in tones of pink – the strength of opaque and translucent white which is printed in-between the colour layers.

Production draft for the Communal Lounge glazing vinyl’s for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft of the Restaurant glazing vinyl for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft detail of the Restaurant elevation glazing vinyl for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft for the Communal Lounge glazing vinyl’s for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

Draft for the Large Activity Room glazing vinyl’s for Harrison Park, Hull. Artist: Christopher Tipping

The trick with all these proposals is to get the right proportion of printed cover, clear glazing and translucency. All very well on paper – but once installed, there are views beyond the glazing to consider too. The movement of traffic, activity of people and the ever changing weather. These all impact considerably on how the installed artwork can be read and appreciated, both from at distance and from up close.

Full scale printed samples are the next item on the list.

 

 

A short walk around the site –

Friday 26th February 2016, Ashton-Under-Lyne 

OK – so Day 1 began with a project team meeting and then a walk around the site.

A few of the Tameside Macmillan Unit Project Team. Tameside Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A few of the Tameside Macmillan Unit Project Team and Art Steering Group members. Left to right – Michael Hughes Project Architect IBI Group – Gareth Llewellyn Capital Projects Manager for the Trust – Sarah Lowiss Haematology Cancer Specialist Nurse – Vanessa Hickson Macmillan Clinical Nurse Specialist: Breast Care – Stewart Ramsden Patient User Representative. Tameside Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

All those mentioned above are standing outside the Ladysmith Building. Bronwen Gwillim of Willis Newson, was part of the group but not in the image –

The Ladysmith Building will be completely refurbished under the new Tameside Macmillan Unit proposals. The project is very exciting and the architects proposals will radically alter the interior and exterior spaces. A transformational experience for staff, service users and visitors alike.

Tameside Hospital, Ladysmith Building Courtyard awaiting refurbishment. Image: Christopher Tipping

Tameside Hospital, Ladysmith Building Courtyard awaiting refurbishment. Image: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Ladysmith Building, Tameside Hospital, prior to refurbishment. Image: Christopher Tipping

Interior of the Ladysmith Building, Tameside Hospital, prior to refurbishment. Image: Christopher Tipping

The view from the entrance to the new Tameside Macmillan Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

The view from the entrance to the new Tameside Macmillan Unit. Image: Christopher Tipping

The new Tameside Macmillan Unit will be housed in the single storey building on the far left of this image behind the Heras fencing. Image: Christopher Tipping

The new Tameside Macmillan Unit will be housed in the single storey building on the far left of this image behind the Heras fencing. Image: Christopher Tipping

The new Macmillan Unit will need to be visible and welcoming to compete with the large scale and massing of adjacent buildings along this hospital road.

Zen-like barrier planting at Tameside Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

Zen-like barrier planting at Tameside Hospital. Image: Christopher Tipping

I like the way that this barrier planting has been maintained & has created a Zen-like ambience than was probably intentioned !

The tall brick chimney on the Tameside Hospital site can be clearly seen from the top of Wild Bank. Image: Christopher Tipping

The tall brick chimney on the Tameside Hospital site can be clearly seen from the top of Wild Bank. Image: Christopher Tipping

As with most hospital sites, the developments have been ad-hoc, often within an original boundary, into which the hospital has expanded to fit ! A wide range of buildings, from early industrial and workhouse architecture is still evident amidst the larger scale of later 20th century developments. The hospital recently completed a massive PFI build which has brought the site into the 21st century.