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Ginger Beer anyone?

B. R. Phillips, Invicta Works, 22 – 24 Railway Street, Chatham, made Home Brewed Ginger Beer

‘Phillips Chatham Invicta Mineral Waterworks Unrivaled Brewed Ginger Beer’. !

D.J Whiffen, Invicta Mineral Waterworks, 22 – 24 Railway Street, Chatham

B.R. Philips made Home Brewed Ginger Beer at The Invicta Works, Nos 22 - 24 Railway Street - Chatham Placemaking Project - Chatham Patterns - Image: Christopher Tipping

B.R. Philips made Home Brewed Ginger Beer at The Invicta Works, Nos 22 – 24 Railway Street – Chatham Placemaking Project – Chatham Patterns – Image: Christopher Tipping

Railway Street from New Cut Viaduct date unknown. Collection of Rex Cadman. by Permission of Rex Cadman and Kent Photo Archive.

Railway Street from New Cut Viaduct date unknown. Collection of Rex Cadman. by Permission of Rex Cadman and Kent Photo Archive.

Nos. 20 - 26 Railway Street. Chatham Placemaking Project - Chatham Patterns - Image: Christopher Tipping

No. 26 Railway Street. In 1961, this was the premises of Frank Bannister & Son Ltd – Motor and Motorcycle Engineers. Chatham Placemaking Project – Chatham Patterns – Image: Christopher Tipping

In 1912 – No 26 was the home of the Invicta Furniture and Baggage Depository. No 28 was a Garage and Cycle Works.

Rome House, No 41 Railway Street. Chatham Placemaking Project - Chatham Patterns - Image: Christopher Tipping

Rome House, No 41 Railway Street. Chatham Placemaking Project – Chatham Patterns – Image: Christopher Tipping

The 1848 Ordnance Survey Public Health Map of Chatham shows Rome House – a large detached mansion set in landscaped gardens – opposite St John’s Church on Rome Lane. Following the building of Chatham Railway Station, Rome Lane became Railway Street sometime after 1871. No 41 would have been a new property named after the original house.

A detail from the 1848 OS Public Health Map of Chatham, with St John's Church and Rome House opposite on Rome Lane. The pink line shows the route of the railway and Chatham Railway Station opened in January 1858. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project.

A detail from the 1848 OS Public Health Map of Chatham, with St John’s Church and Rome House on Rome Lane at top right. The pink line shows the eventual route of the railway and Chatham Railway Station, which opened in January 1858. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project.

A detail of the OS Map of Chatham from 1864. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

A detail of the OS Map of Chatham from 1864. By permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

This detail of the OS 1864 Map of Chatham shows Chatham Station at the bottom of this image. Railway Street to Military Road runs from the middle of the image to the top of the image. St John’s Church and Rome House can clearly be seen.

Pentagon Day –

Saturday 7th May 2016 – Pentagon Shopping Centre, Chatham 

A workshop day – talking, being talked to – gathering stories, memories and an understanding of life in Chatham. Thanks to all who cam to speak to us – Elsie was one of them ! Her Dad used to say that the Thomas Waghorn Statue on Railway Street pointed to the toilets under the New Road viaduct. As a young girl, her impression of Chatham was that it was brim full of Public Houses.

Rob Young and Elsie - Pentagon Shopping Centre, Chatham. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

Rob Young and Elsie – Pentagon Shopping Centre, Chatham. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

One of our brilliant badge-makers working with Xtina Lamb. Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

One of our brilliant badge-makers working with Xtina Lamb. Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

'These are our Streets' - Postcards handed out at the Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

‘These are our Streets’ – Postcards handed out at the Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

WE HAVE THE POSTCARDS !

...and we wore the T Shirts!  Chatham Placemaking Project. Pentagon Shopping Centre. Image: Christopher Tipping

…and we wore the T Shirts!
Chatham Placemaking Project. Pentagon Shopping Centre. Image: Christopher Tipping

AND WE WORE THE T SHIRTS !

Very grateful to Shelly Goldsmith, Senior Lecturer in Fashion Textiles: Print at UCA Rochester for producing the shirts for us at very short notice !

Some enthusiastic badge-makers ! Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

Some enthusiastic badge-makers ! Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

Badges made at our Pentagon Shopping Centre workshop day. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

Badges made at our Pentagon Shopping Centre workshop day. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

Chatting about Chatham's History at the Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Rob Young

Chatting about Chatham’s History at the Pentagon Shopping Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Rob Young

Photographs of Chatham past and present helped to jog memories and start conversations. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Rob Young

Photographs of Chatham past and present helped to jog memories and start conversations. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Rob Young

Photographs of Chatham past and present helped to jog memories and start conversations. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Rob Young

Photographs of Chatham past and present helped to jog memories and start conversations. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Rob Young

 

 

 

…and from the top of Overline House

Tuesday 15th March 2016

Very much earlier in the project – back in 2012 – one of the Urban Design consultants on the project – I think from Urban Initiatives – managed to get access to the roof of Overline House, which sits adjacent to the train lines and overlooks our site.

A short film from this vantage point can be seen by clicking on this link – Station Quarter from Overline House 

This image is seen below – along with another taken this week from a similar vantage point on the roof.

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project on Wyndham Place as seen from the roof of Overline House on Blechynden Terrace in 2016 & 2012. 2016 Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. 2012 Image by Urban Initiatives.

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project on Wyndham Place as seen from the roof of Overline House on Blechynden Terrace in 2016 & 2012. 2016 Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping. 2012 Image by Urban Initiatives.

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project on Wyndham Place as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project on Wyndham Place as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project, Wyndham Place as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project, Wyndham Place as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Wyndham Place & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Wyndham Place & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Wyndham Place & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Wyndham Place & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project - Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House,  Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

A section of Southampton Station Quarter North Project – Blechynden Terrace & Station Forecourt as seen from the roof of Overline House, Blechynden Terrace. Image by Project Artist Christopher Tipping

 

 

Chatham Maps

 

Details from OS 1864 & OS 1932 Maps of Chatham - by permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

Details from OS 1864 & OS 1932 Maps of Chatham – by permission of Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre. Chatham Placemaking Project. Image: Christopher Tipping

The two OS Maps above show developments along the project route over 68 years between 1864 and 1932. The maps can be read left to right – from Chatham Station, along Railway Street, Military Road and The Paddock. Of particular interest is the area just above St John’s Church. In 1864 this appears to have been private gardens or grounds, with trees or orchards planted. BY 1932 this had all been consumed by timber Yards and Sawmills. This was the site of Scott’s Timber Yard.

Jack Harrison VC

The new development at Orchard Park, due for completion in 2017 is to be called ‘Harrison Park’ , 100 years after Jack Harrison VC, a former Hull FC Rugby League Star was killed at Oppy Wood,  Arras, France in 1917 during the First World War.

A Pinterest Board of research images about Orchard Park and its history, can be found here. This will be added to throughout the project.

Hull was awarded  City of Culture 2017 so there is much to celebrate in the lead up to this brilliant event for the city.

 

 

FrancisKnight and LDA Design, Margate Steps

Friday 4th September 2015 – Meeting with Francis Knight Public Art Consultancy and LDA Design at Margate Steps – 

Margate Flood & Coast Protection Scheme. Aerial image obtained from a multi-rotor copter by photographer Dean Barkley. Image: Dean Barkley

Margate Flood & Coast Protection Scheme. Aerial image obtained from a multi-rotor copter by photographer Dean Barkley. Image: Dean Barkley

Margate Coastal Flood & Protection Project aka Margate Steps. Margate, Kent. Image: Christopher Tipping

Margate Coastal Flood & Protection Project aka Margate Steps. Margate, Kent. Image: Christopher Tipping

 

I met up with Laura Knight and Louise Francis of FrancisKnight Public Art Consultants along with Neil Mattinson and Jennifer Corlett of LDA Design. Neil & Jennifer hadn’t visited Margate or the Margate Steps before so this was a good opportunity to see a successful coastal engineering project , which also happens to provide a considerable and much need public realm and meeting place for residents and visitors alike. The project also encompasses much of Margate’s legacy and heritage as a seaside town which has seen storms and weather act as the primary catalyst for changes and regeneration.

My role as project artist within the integrated design team on the Margate Coastal Flood & Protection Project – aka Margate Steps – was to influence and challenge the design process via contextual and site responsive research and collaborative practice. The scope for influencing the process within the Chatham Placemaking Project is a similar one – albeit a much shorter consultancy – and is as much about a collaborative and discussive one.

This was a useful and engaging meeting, where we had an open discussion about the scope for the Chatham project, whilst also experiencing and reviewing a recent regeneration project at first hand.

Merthyr Tydfil Bus Station and Link Bridge

9th February 2015

I have now made two visits to Merthyr Tydfil & am preparing to go up again this week for two days to meet with the project team and Capita, who will be delivering the Bus Station. Capita recently completed the The River Taff Central Link and Bridge –  a new road system that connects Merthyr Learning Quarter at the existing Penry Street Bridge, through Avenue De Clichy, across the new road bridge located south of Swan Street, and via the new road in front of the College. The new bridge is a major landmark for the town.

The town centre is fascinating & has some wonderful architecture. Just remember to look up above the shop fronts to see the architectural detail! Key anchor buildings are still extant & a good deal of regeneration is breathing new life into these buildings and by default, back into the town centre. The RedHouse, an arts and cultural centre – in the former Town Hall –  is a singular example of great regeneration practice & takes in the adjoining Penderyn Square – As part of the Heritage Quarter development, a new civic square outside the renovated Old Town Hall will be a key focal point for the cultural identity of Merthyr Tydfil.  The square will be a vibrant environment that will host events across the year celebrating the heritage of the town”. 

I have done a lot of walking and am talking to whoever I can to enlighten me on the legacy and heritage of the town, but also about its aspiration and spirit for the future.

I have also been asked to contribute to a feasibility study commissioned by Merthyr Tydfil CBC, to look into replacing the existing footbridge link from the College, to St Tydfil’s Shopping Centre with a new footbridge which also extends to the site of the new Bus Station on Swan Street. The project is being delivered by Mott MacDonald  & Knight Architects.  This pedestrian connectivity is a critical element in unifying the accessibility of trains, buses  and pedestrian routes in the town. It serves also to improve and build upon the visual impact a new footbridge may have as a landmark attraction and destination along the Taff Trail, bringing more tourists and visitors to the town centre.

The site of the new Bus Station on Swan Street. Image: Christoher Tipping

The site of the new Bus Station on Swan Street. Image: Christoher Tipping

This site, on the corner of Swan Street and Avenue de Clichy was until recently, the home of the Hollies Health Centre, which has now moved to state of the art new facilities in the Keir Hardie Health Park at Cyfarthfa. The old buildings have now  been demolished. The old Police Station – right & centre of picture, is also in process of demolition to make way for the Bus Station. The back of the St Tydfil’s Shopping Centre can be see on the left of this image.

The new Bus Station site as seen from the new River Taff Road bridge. Image: Christopher Tipping

The new Bus Station site as seen from the new River Taff Road bridge. Image: Christopher Tipping

360 Panoramic image of the Swan Street site. Residential flats and two schools lie to the south of the site & a sensitive response is imperative. Image: Christopher Tipping

360 Panoramic image of the Swan Street site. Residential flats and two schools lie to the south of the site & a sensitive response is imperative. Image: Christopher Tipping

The current Bus Station off Castle Street. Image: Christopher Tipping

The current Bus Station off Castle Street. Image: Christopher Tipping

This image looks grim, but to be fair, the weather on the day was dreadful ! If you turned around, the views out to the surrounding hills are great, even on a horrible day. Castle Street now leads onto the new River Taff Central Link Road at one end and the Redhouse at the other – both, great examples of the power of regeneration schemes in the town to make credible changes.

The College, Merthyr Tydfil, which opened on September 2nd 2013. Image: Christopher Tipping

The College, Merthyr Tydfil, which opened on September 2nd 2013. Image: Christopher Tipping

Panoramic image of the College at Merthyr Tydfil showing the new road and extensive public realm. The River Taff footbridge is at the far right of this image. Image: Christopher Tipping

Panoramic image of the College at Merthyr Tydfil showing the new road and extensive public realm. The River Taff footbridge is at the far right of this image. Image: Christopher Tipping

This area was the site of the former Ynysfach Ironworks, owned and run by the Crawshay Family of Cyfarthfa Ironworks. The new road seen running through the site  above almost follows the path of the former Glamorganshire Canal, which was fully opennd in 1794 and declined progressively between 1898 & 1951. Much of the Canal route is now buried beneath the A470 Cardiff to Merthyr Tydfil Truck Rd.

The view upstream from the River Taff Footbridge. towards the Civic Centre.  Image: Christopher Tipping

The view upstream from the River Taff Footbridge. towards the Civic Centre. Image: Christopher Tipping

Where the River Taff meanders to the left in the above image and turns the corner, was the site of the Ynysgau Iron Bridge, one of the first Cast Iron Bridges built anywhere in the world, started in 1799 & completed in 1800. The bridge was designed and built by Watkins George, a brilliant engineer working for Richard Crawshay of Cyfarthfa Ironworks, known as the Iron King. The bridge was constructed for the workforce to cross the Taff to reach the Ironworks. It was dismantled in 1963 and is now stored by Merthyr Tydfil CBC.

Sections and details of the Ynysgau Iron Bridge, dismantled in 1963 and now stored by Merthyr Tydfil CBC. Image: Christopher Tipping

Sections and details of the Ynysgau Iron Bridge, dismantled in 1963 and now stored by Merthyr Tydfil CBC. Image: Christopher Tipping

Communications and advances in transport were critical factors behind the expansion of Iron production during the Industrial Revolution.  Natural water supplies found in the Taff and its tributaries & streams provided the source of power, but this had to be managed and controlled. Innovation and technological advances were the powerhouses.

Merthyr Tydfil may  no  longer claim to be the Iron Capitol of the world, but transport and innovation continues to be the catalyst for change in the area.

The River Taff footbridge crosses just below the weir from the College to St Tydfils Shopping Centre. Image: Christopher Tipping

The River Taff footbridge crosses just below the weir from the College to St Tydfils Shopping Centre. Image: Christopher Tipping

The footbridge was built in the early 1970's but wasn't always covered. The bridge spans not only the River Taff, but the Avenue de Clichy & Wilkinson's Carpark . Image: Christopher Tipping

The footbridge was built in the early 1970’s but wasn’t always covered. The bridge spans not only the River Taff, but the Avenue de Clichy & Wilkinson’s Carpark . Image: Christopher Tipping

Looking downstream from the footbridge the views change between retail carpark, highway and river. Image: Christopher Tipping

Looking downstream from the footbridge the views change between retail carpark, highway and river. Image: Christopher Tipping

This distinct zoning of views as one crosses the bridge could also change considerable during the year. It’s a great feature from where to see the town  – its downfall being that it isn’t particularly good to look at ! A new footbridge would have the potential to exploit this fact too and make the most of the opportunities presented.

 

 

 

 

 

Powell-Cotton Museum, Birchington, Kent

Spent the morning yesterday at the Powell-Cotton Museum at Quex Park, Birchington, Kent. I have been here a lot & it never fails to impress and surprise me.

These following images have been taken during a number of recent visits –

Diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex Park, Kent

Diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex Park, Kent

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex House, Kent

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex House, Kent

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex Park, Kent

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex Park, Kent

Giant Sable Antelope - by far my favourite exhibit ! Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex Park, Kent -

Giant Sable Antelope – by far my favourite exhibit ! Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex Park, Kent –

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex House, Kent.

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum, Quex House, Kent.

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum. Quex Park, Kent

Detail from diorama at Powell-Cotton Museum. Quex Park, Kent

 

 

Central Chelmsford – York Stone steps in progress

Works are well underway by the Ashfield Group to manufacture and supply the artwork step details to the project. The double height steps in York Stone are being inset with a darker granite text detail set into the face of the riser, which is part of the art interpretation on site. These double height steps will also have a slatted timber top, which creates ad hoc seating within the main sequence of steps at the southern end of the site. The timber will also carry cnc routed text.

Individual water jet cut granite letters are inset into York Stone, which has had the word already cut by water jet as a negative space. Image by Ashfield Group

Individual water jet cut granite letters are inset into York Stone, which has had the word already cut by water jet as a negative space. Image by Ashfield Group

The letters are cut from granite tiles. Image by Ashfield Group

The letters are cut from granite tiles. Image by Ashfield Group

Waterjet Cutting the stone (4)

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

Image by Ashfield Group

The finished step block with negative text space awaiting granite letters to be inset. Image by Ashfield Group

Finished ! Image by Ashfield Group

Finished ! Image by Ashfield Group